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SabrinaLeibas1

Venting...

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SabrinaLeibas1

Hi.. my name is Sabrina. I’m 22 years old and was first diagnosed with gestationaldiabetes when I was 16. It remained a hidden, silent killer of me after my pregnancy. I went on little dr visits for myself.. and appeared to be fine so the drs said I was a-okay.  anyways about a year and a half-ish a go I was diagnosed full fledged type two diabetic with an A1C of 8.3.... I IMMEDIATELY pushed myself to lose weight and lower my A1C.. six months after my diagnosis id lost 20 pounds and my A1C was a 5.1. perfectly normal... or so you’d think...

it’s been around a year since then... and ever since I’ve STILL have difficulties with low sugar. And it’s way too often. I do take care of my self. Still exercise and eat right. (Maybe not all the time but I do why I can)

anyways these low sugar attacks are what really kills me now....

even an hour after I eat a full dinner plate... my sugar just drops sometimes.... it’s not every night but atleast twice a month.... seriously this shoot makes me hate myself. I hate how low sugar makes me feel. I hate that I lash out at my loved ones.. I hate that I can’t control my own body to stop shaking... I hate that I have to force myself to eat.... I hate puking. I hate crying so hard it gives me a headache for three days... I literally hate everything about being diabetic... SPECIALLY after I put in SO MUCH I MEAN SO MUCH HARD WORK to lose weight and lower my A1C.... I’ve felt this way for a long time and have tried communicating to my friends and family how I really feel.... but no one understands.... everyone thinks it’ll just get better one day... and what really suck is I know the reality that this won’t ever get better... and it will literally consume me and my life until I die... I’m sorry I’m getting kind of dark here... but it’s how I really feel. And I can’t say it to anyone else or they think I’m crazy.... I’m tired of feeling so helpless and alone... and I hardly see many new posts on here ... but man if even just one person could help me out..... you have no idea how much it would mean to me...

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Kit

HI Sabrina, welcome to the group. 

 

I can completely understand how you feel. This disease can be scary and frustrating. 

 

I haven't been sleeping much lately and I only have my phone so it's hard for me to go into details, but I suspect you may be dealing with reactive hypoglycemia. 

 

With insulin resistance, our bodies have to produce more and more insulin to handle raising blood glucose levels after a meal. It basically over compensates, causing the hypo. 

 

The good news is that this is a good sign that your pancreas is still able to produce a decent amount of insulin. 

 

The best way to combat this is to lower the body's need to produce insulin. Keeping active and lodging excess weight can certainly help with this. 

 

Added to this is to also drop your carb intake on meals. This lowers your blood glucose rise and this reduces your body's need to produce insulin and this minimizes possible hypos. 

 

Of you can give us an some examples of the types of meals you eat, we may be able to give suggestions that can help. 

 

Also, are you on any meds and if so, what are they? Some diabetes meds actually force the pancreas to produce more insulin and can easily cause hypos. 

 

I can't miss you that diabetes isn't something that you won't have to think about for the rest of your life, but it does not need to consume it. 

 

You do not have to be alone with this. We understand. 

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dowling gram

Hi Sabrina  

Kit is right. You will always have to keep in the back of your mind that you are diabetic but it need not consume you. It may be that you have to change your diet or medication or start taking some if you are not on anything. You can live a normal life you just need a little help to get things right.

 

Please let us know what your diet is like. What we eat is the biggest factor in getting control of our blood glucose and keeping it on an an even keel without extreme highs and lows. The right Medication can help too so tell us if you are on anything and what it is.

 

We will help you through this. We have all been there. We may not have had your lows but everyone here has had some problem at first until they got things right and we are here to help.

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meyery2k

Sabrina, welcome!

 

Diet, medication, and exercise can play significant roles as explained already.

 

Please tell us what, if any, medication you are taking and your meals.

 

Some have found that they can manage this with diet and exercise and don't need the medication which simplifies things a little. ~ Mike

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SabrinaLeibas1

Thank you guys for you quick replies and support. As I said before you have no idea how much it means to me. 

As far as my diet, 

 

breakfast: usually 2 eggs, 1 what toast and I’ll pick a fruit smoothie.

 

Lunches are skimpier usually only a salad and a fruit. If not a salad a what sandwich or chicken wrap and fruit.

 

dinner is either fish(cod or shrimp) and chicken. (I try to stay away from beef and pork as they’re high in fat and just pretty much bad for you) a side of veggies, and rice or wheat pasta 

 

As previously stated I usually do fine. And only have hypo twice a month... but it keeps progressing. I used to only have i once every month, and before that once around every 8-10 weeks.

 

I went back to the gym recently as of this week. First full week back so now log in an hour a day at the gym 5 days a week. 30 min cardio 30 muscle training. 

 

Im currently not on any medications as my A1C is with in normal range and I don’t suffer from high blood sugar anymore so there’s no need for metformin or glimipride (what they had me on when I was originally diagnosed)

 

Being as young as I am, I believed if I worked hard enough I didn’t need the medication to handle my high blood sugar, working out and eating right really helped me get off the meds. 

 

I dont think im skipping over anything but if there’s more questions I’ll gladly answer them 

 

 

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meyery2k

When you have diabetes, there is a problem with glucose management.  Many of us find that we have to avoid simple starches like bread, pasta, rice, and root vegetables.  The sugar in fruit, fructose, spikes many of us.  Fat is not the bad thing we have been led to believe.  There is documentation that fats were promoted as bad to encourage the disastrous "food pyramids" many governments and dieticians recommend.  Search these posts and you will see many examples where people struggled with the <Fill in the blank> Diabetes Association's guidelines.  They stepped out and tried low carb and many saw dramatic improvement.

 

One possibility can be that, while your A1c is good, you are spiking and then crashing.  Walmart has the Relion meter and 100 strips for about $20.  Try this...

 

Test before you eat.  Record this.  Test about 1 hour after you eat.  Record this.  Test about 1 more hour later.  A normal response would be to see a higher number at one hour (non diabetics rarely go over 120) and then be back to about where you started at 2 hours.  If you are still elevated 2 hours later, test at hour 3, then hour 4.  Eventually you will see the number drop and, indeed, maybe even go lower than where it began.  Great, right?  Not necessarily.  What happened is that if you are insulin resistant your body refused to uptake the glucose.  Your body just continued making insulin and, eventually, overcame the resistance but now there is too much insulin so your glucose went too low.  We call this eating to your meter.  Eventually you will find meals that don't spike you.

 

The other idea would be to try and lower your carbohydrate intake to 100g a day and, in time to 50g or lower.  Many of us do that and it really helps us.  Even those that use insulin would say that limiting carbs helps them use less insulin and not get into this swinging highs and lows.

 

I was diagnosed a little over 3 years ago.  I weighed 313 pounds and would huff and puff walking around the house.  Diet and exercise were like hitting a reset button for me.  I lost 100 pounds in a year and took up cycling.  I now regularly long distance cycle.  You DON'T need many carbs.  Let me repeat that, you DON'T need many carbs.  Low Carb High Fat gives me all the energy I need.  My BP and cholesterol are also excellent.  My carbs are primarily from non root vegetables, nuts, and small quantities of berries now and then.  Cyclists on the road have all this carb heavy gels, cubes, whatever.  My energy stash is a small pack of salted macadamia nuts.  They laugh until I ride most of them into the ground lol...

 

I don't want this to get overly long so I will stop here but I would encourage you to take a little jump in faith and see what happens.  I was extremely skeptical when I first came here but, think about it, people that live with diabetes would know far more about it than those who read about it in books.

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Hammer

The above comments are all really good suggestions.  Looking at your meals, you should get rid of the toast, fruit smoothies, all fruit, all bread and wraps, rice, pasta, and you should eat fat....the good fats, not the bad fats.  Use olive oil liberally, eat the fat on beef, the skin on chicken, use real butter, not margarine or those spreads, if you drink tea or coffee and you use milk in it, use heavy cream instead of milk, avoid all cereals, stay away from grains (and no, whole grains are NOT good for you), avoid potatoes and any other starchy vegetables, like corn or peas.  If you're wondering what you can eat, we have a recipe section here that has all sorts of recipes for low carb foods.  All meats are good, as are eggs, and most green, leafy vegetables, as well as broccoli, cauliflower, and pretty much anything that is contained in a chef's salad (except the croutons).  The thing to do is to read the nutrition labels on foods to see how many carbs it contains, and if it doesn't have a nutrition label, look it up on the internet.

 

As Mike mentioned, if you don't have a meter, get one and test before and after each meal, because by doing that, you can see what each food does to your glucose levels, and having that information, will allow you select foods that don't spike your glucose levels that much.  For example, if you want to eat an apple, you test before you eat it, then two hours after you've eaten it.  If you see that your glucose levels are a lot higher after you've eaten the apple, than they were before you ate the apple, then you know that you can't eat a whole apple.  Days later, if you decide to eat an apple, you can just eat half of an apple, and do the same testing.  If your after meal spike is still too high, then you know you can't eat half of an apple.  The next day, you decide to eat one quarter of an apple, and do the same testing.  If your after meal spike is close to your before meal reading, then you know that you can eat a quarter of an apple.  This is what Mike referred to when he said that we "eat to our meter".

 

Keep this in mind....carbs are addictive....the more you eat, the more you crave.  If you lower your carb intake to say, 50 carbs a day, and eat that many for a while, then one day you cheat and eat something that has a lot of carbs in it, you will want to keep eating a lot of carbs, and it's harder to go back to eating 50 carbs a day for a short period of time.  If you lower your carb intake, you might get what we call "the carb flu", which makes you feel like you're under the weather for a while.  That is the result of your body trying to adapt to the lowered carb intake.  It's only temporary, and it will go away.

 

Sabrina, you are not alone here....we have all gone through similar experiences like you're going through.  This forum is like one big family, and we all try to help each other with whatever issues we might have, so feel free to come here and vent, or to ask questions, or to share your experiences, that's what we do here.  We welcome all questions, not just questions about diabetes, because considering that this forum has over 60,000 members worldwide, whatever you have questions about, someone will have the answers, or at least, will be able to point you to where you can find those answers.

 

Oh, and welcome to the forums!

 

 

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Kit

I echo @meyery2kabove. It sounds like you are being good and doing what you are told. Sadly what you ate experiencing is exactly the kind of thing that happens when you do that.

 

Carbohydrates have a very real affect on out blood glucose levels. Our bodies turn them directly into glucose. Protein has a minimal affect. Fat has next to no affect at all.  Because of this, many of us follow a lchf (low carb, moderate protein, high fat) diet as it plays best with our numbers. 

 

Breakfast was at 5:30am this morning. I had 2 pieces bacon, two eggs fried in the bacon fat, and a mixture of sautéed greens with a little onion, bell pepper, and mushrooms. My mother's wake is tomorrow, her funeral Tuesday. I have been so busy, I didn't even think about eating again until almost 5:30pm.  I just sat down to a ribeye steak served with a sauté of mushrooms, bell pepper, onion, asparagus tips, and more of those greens. There was alsosome butter in there

 

When cooking I make use of a number of healthy fats. Lard and tallow (NOT hydrogenated!), butter, olive oil, avocado oil, and coconut oil. I avoid canola oil, soybean oil, corn oil, and similar which are a source of high inflammatory omega 6 fats. Modern people eat wax too many pufas (polyunsaturated fatty acids). 

 

I know this flies in the face of everything we are told. I too faithfully followed their instructions and my glucose levels were way too high. I was diagnosed with an A1C of 10.4. Two months later I was down to less than 800 calories a day because my numbers were way too high. And they were still too high. That's when I ran across the blood sugar 101 web site (google it) which led me here. I spent two days reading every post there was (including archives), created an account, said I was going lchf, and never looked back. 6 months after diagnosis I had an a1c of 5.2, and I've basically bounced in the high 4s and low 5s ever since. And that's with halving the medication I was on.

 

As you can see from my description above, I focus my vegetable intake on low carb above ground vegetables. And the few for vegetables I eat are more for seasoning such as garlic, onion, and similar. I limit my fruit intake to either the non sweet fruits, such as avocado, zucchini, yellow squash, or a few berries every now and then. Usually when they are in season and taste the best. I like to make a parfait of a few sliced strawberries, a few blackberries, unsweetened whipped cream (berries have all the sweet I need). 

 

Give it a try for a week or two and see what kind of affect on your numbers. I'm sure you will be surprised by the results. 

 

From your post, it sounds like you have a young child. I'm 46 years old and I bury my mother in two days and it's breaking my heart. Don't make your child go through this too young. I'm almost 47 (in 1 month) and i feel like I am too young! 

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dowling gram

Sebrina. When I read your post about your diet the first thing I thought is you've bought into the false thinking that good fats are bad for you. Nothing could be further from the truth. Yes bad fats like transfats are bad but good fat isn't. Good fat doesn't make you fat, Carbs do.

 

There is one truth that no one has mentioned. When you cut carbs you are cutting your source of energy. The body is a marvelous thing. When carbs are cut it looks for a substitute and it uses fat instead. That's why the new Keto diet and Atkin;s works. Before my diagnoses I ate a lot of carbs mainly in the form of bread. When I switched to low carb and ditched the whole wheat bread and increased my fat intake I lost 40 pounds in less than 3 months and I've maintained my weight ever since. Good sources of fat are butter, cream, Coconut oil, olive oil, avocado oil, bacon and meat and fish and some other foods. The best source of good fat is a ripe avocado.

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meyery2k

Yes, Dowling raises a great point.  When I was getting dialed in, I would stop for fish and chips for lunch (lots of carbs) on my long rides and find that I would get the energy boost and keep on.  One day, I went to the Chinese restaurant and loaded up on their roast pork.  Chinese roast pork uses pork belly which is very fatty.  I had salad with ranch dressing instead of the rice.  I noticed something different, and to me, better.  It took some time to get the energy boost compared to fish and chips but it lasted significantly longer too.

 

Many high-intensity athletes are trying high fat and finding that it works quite well for them.

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dowling gram

I forgot to add cheese and nuts to my list of good fat foods. I also wanted to add that switching to a high fat low carb diet does not effect your heart like has been touted by most in the medical community. You are burning off that fat intake for energy.

 

 

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fattyboyjp3

Sabrina, I hear ya!   Diabetes doesn't care that we have loved ones it doesn't care that we bust our asses to try to fix things and eat right.   It doesn't matter we workout or now I am taking this trulicity, right now I have no side effects but one day I am sure this will all change.  We all are Guinea pigs

The sucky thing is we all react differently to everything nobody is the same.  I talk Dark all the time to family, but as fast as this came on to me it's scary!  My Doc tells me I will be type 1 soon.  That pisses me off!   I was 250lbs now I am 170 you would think things should be good, it's not my numbers suck sometimes and I eat Lettuce and veggies and FIsh and Chicken O do try not to eat breads.  But I still eat stupid stuff but I exercise too.   All we can do is Pray for tomorrow I guess, But if your sugar is low try to eat things to bring it up sometimes its one slice of good bread!  Try not to be really good on your eating, try to add things back in, sometimes we have to go with our gut feelings SOme doctors don't know everything. then again who am I?

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