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buddy7

Is our supermarket bottle water is really ordinary tap water?

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OneEye
5 hours ago, Gladtobehere said:

A TADPOLE in your tap water is a good reason for using bottled water.  It implies that your local water treatment facility has a fairly serious  problem.

 

Maybe more than that.

1. Faucet valves open about 1 millimeter off the valve seat to let the pressurized water into your faucet.
2. Frog eggs, on average, are about 1.5mm, tadpoles are larger. Neither can fit through a water valve or a faucet aerator.

3. Tadpoles are complex organisms and can't live in a pressurized water environment. The average household water pressure, after it leaves the step-down pressure valve at the street, is 40 to 60 pounds. Before the step-down valve...water pressure can be as high as 100 lbs-per-square inch to accommodate fire hydrants.

4. Chlorine kills frog eggs and tadpoles. This is why you never see tadpoles in a swimming pool.

 

As Gladtobehere alludes to...there's a serious problem here if all of those deterrents have failed. I would have put the tadpole in a jar of formaldehyde and labeled it Houdini the Tadpole.

 

 

 

 

Edited by OneEye
edited for speling

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buddy7
18 hours ago, OneEye said:

 

Maybe more than that.

1. Faucet valves open about 1 millimeter off the valve seat to let the pressurized water into your faucet.
2. Frog eggs, on average, are about 1.5mm, tadpoles are larger. Neither can fit through a water valve or a faucet aerator.

3. Tadpoles are complex organisms and can't live in a pressurized water environment. The average household water pressure, after it leaves the step-down pressure valve at the street, is 40 to 60 pounds. Before the step-down valve...water pressure can be as high as 100 lbs-per-square inch to accommodate fire hydrants.

4. Chlorine kills frog eggs and tadpoles. This is why you never see tadpoles in a swimming pool.

 

As Gladtobehere alludes to...there's a serious problem here if all of those deterrents have failed. I would have put the tadpole in a jar of formaldehyde and labeled it Houdini the Tadpole.

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the education OneEye, what an extraordinary lesson: I’ve done quite a lot of jobs in my working life, some of my curriculum veto: Engineering, Mechanical engineering, Maintenance engineering, and Management, I’ve spin/turned 6 cylinder crankshafts, on a Centre lathe working to a + 10 Thou for grinding, all tungsten tipped tool bits, all from architect drawings. Also worked on Capstan lathe mass-producing vehicle parts. Work on most types of motor cars for rally-cross driving, taking Belt Driven Assembly (BDA) engines out the car, for a crankshaft change or other, started 8 o’clock in the morning, up and running by 16.30 hrs or next day. And Maintenance Engineering doing service calls to factories around the country, you walk into a factory with all the Hi-Tec plant you can think of, when one breaks down, my job was to diagnose/fault find the problem, either fix-it or order the parts on-site for the next day’s delivery, come back the next day and fix the problem. I’ve fixed heating radiators to my adjoining rooms, toilet systems, all my taps/faucet to bath/basin, kitchen plus the garden. And never had a certified Plumbing ticket.

 

And, why I’m thanking you for the lesson, I’ve never had any mathematical tuition on how a tap/faucet valve works internally at the time, I do now. And that is disregarding the Frog-eggs and tadpoles, but again, I have to thank you for the Biology on tadpoles and water pressures, and No 4 I did not know Chlorine kills frog eggs and tadpoles. (Sorry my ignorance). But I do love your pun “a jar of formaldehyde and labelled it Houdini the Tadpole”.(You have this tendency to awe this subtle sense of humour) love it.

 

Like all the service jobs and home repairs, I’ve encountered in my past employment, all of the gear was brand new equipment/parts. Yes, I had a damn good idea why things won’t work, that was my job, to put it right.

 

The point I'm trying to raise. Above all, I was never inept.

Of course, the above was, old-school a long time ago, now I’ve gone old and rusty.

Getting too old for this s**t have to stop meeting like this.

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buddy7

Went to the “Costco” wholesale yesterday to collect my monthly supplies of bottled water, my supply for the month 2 packs of sparkling water and 1 pack of ordinary spring water. 3 packs x 40 = 120 bottles. On cashing out, I thought for one moment I was been overcharge, but thought nothing of it at the time, paid for the transaction by cash.

 

Don’t know if the same procedure happens at your Costco, having paid the cashier for the goods, you and your grocery cart go to the exit where 2 Costco store personal stands at the exit door, to check what’s on your receipt is the same as what is in your grocery cart.

 

NOW, here’s what happened to me, on checking my grocery cart they were a discrepancy, the receipt had more items than what was in the grocery cart. After being questioned for a few minutes by Costco store personal, he asks me to follow him back into the store, where another store person double-check my receipt and grocery cart. What seems to be a bad situation, it turned out that the till cashier charge me for 4 packs of water, instead of 3 packs. So, to bring the matter to a close, Costco was happy to refund me, the excess I was overcharged, the matter was therefore closed and I leave the store with my refund and purchased goods.

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Diana_CT

Here in Connecticut there was a big brou·ha·ha over a local municipal water company selling to a bottling company at a discount price.

Quote

 

The result is high-octane fuel for a debate at the Connecticut General Assembly and the Hartford region’s water authority, the Metropolitan District Commission, about the ethics, efficacy and environmental impact of what is projected this year to become the most popular packaged beverage in the United States – the ubiquitous, single-serve, plastic bottle of water.

 

Niagara, a California-based seller of bottled water under its own name and private labels at stores like Costco, intends to buy up to 1.8 million gallons of water a day at a discount from the Metropolitan District Commission and bottle it at a 443,000-square-foot plant it would build in the Hartford suburb of Bloomfield, where it also would produce millions of plastic bottles daily

https://ctmirror.org/2016/03/14/public-water-private-profits-a-fight-over-mdcs-tap-water/

 

 

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TX_Clint

I grew up drinking water from a cistern. It was treated with chlorine. We used household bleach. I do remember just a little goes a long way. The water was mostly rain water from a roof catchment system. If we had too little rain you could have water delivered in a tanker. I only remember that happening once. I know of no one getting ill from drinking cistern water. I have had several relatives live into their high 80's to mid 90's drinking this water all their lives.

I do remember one never ever was to drink untreated surface water.

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OneEye
3 hours ago, buddy7 said:

Don’t know if the same procedure happens at your Costco, having paid the cashier for the goods, you and your grocery cart go to the exit where 2 Costco store personal stands at the exit door, to check what’s on your receipt is the same as what is in your grocery cart.

 

When Walmart first opened in town here...it was a few months before I shopped there. Went for one item, a hand vacuum cleaner, ended up doing more shopping...since I was already there.

 

Waited in line, a long line (I hate lines, long or short), paid for my stuff, loaded it up and headed for the exit. Same thing at this Walmart as your Costco, couple people at the door wanting to see my receipt and check what's in the cart. I wanted to argue that the checkout person and I just went through this no more than a minute ago...that maybe they should figure out some other type of "theft security" than making me feel like a potential shoplifter. I took the high road, let them do their thing and never went back. I now do that type of shopping online. No driving downtown; no looking for a parking spot; no standing in line and it's delivered to my door...without asking me to go get my picture ID drivers license to make sure I'm the one who's name is on the package.

 

In this age on evolving shopping...I picture a time in the near future when they have a camera system in the big stores where you can virtually walk down the aisles like you do now in a store picking out items and adding them to your cart. Maybe an audio along with that so you can ask the fat guy in the electric cart to move forward just a bit so you can see all the marinara sauce choices!

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buddy7
 
 
 
 
20 hours ago, Diana_CT said:

 

The result is high-octane fuel for a debate at the Connecticut General Assembly and the Hartford region’s water authority, the Metropolitan District Commission, about the ethics, efficacy and environmental impact of what is projected this year to become the most popular packaged beverage in the United States – the ubiquitous, single-serve, plastic bottle of water.

 

Niagara, a California-based seller of bottled water under its own name and private labels at stores like Costco, intends to buy up to 1.8 million gallons of water a day at a discount from the Metropolitan District Commission and bottle it at a 443,000-square-foot plant it would build in the Hartford suburb of Bloomfield, where it also would produce millions of plastic bottles daily

 

There’s no doubt about it, the bottled water industry is an absolute thriving industry worldwide.

The demand for bottled water has been growing during the last decade, owing to health and wellness concerns. And looking at the number of known beverage companies around the globe there are also improving and follow suit.

 

The bottled water industry was valued at US$ 185 billion in 2015 and is expected to reach US$ 334 billion by 2023, this is the forecast period 2018-2023.

 

We just have to deal with the ubiquitous plastic bottle that hinges itself/incur to plastic pollution.

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buddy7
20 hours ago, TX_Clint said:

I grew up drinking water from a cistern. It was treated with chlorine. We used household bleach. I do remember just a little goes a long way. The water was mostly rain water from a roof catchment system. If we had too little rain you could have water delivered in a tanker. I only remember that happening once. I know of no one getting ill from drinking cistern water. I have had several relatives live into their high 80's to mid 90's drinking this water all their lives.

I do remember one never ever was to drink untreated surface water.

Of course, one suspects today especially in some tropical developing countries this method/process still exist, the source of catching rainwater still applies, but again science and technology in these developing countries I hearken to say, is still way behind the western society until the worlds scientist/technology catches up, they’ll tell you, the drinking rainwater is bad for you, until such time it’s my view the practice will continue.

 

Unfortunately, the world is a changing, and the environmental impact has a lot to do with it, and I have no doubt, bottled water is the way forward.

 

‘Live into their high 80's to mid-90's drinking this water all their lives’. Look, Clint, if the water has some power of longevity, then, I’m all for it. 😃

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buddy7
18 hours ago, OneEye said:

 

When Walmart first opened in town here...it was a few months before I shopped there. Went for one item, a hand vacuum cleaner, ended up doing more shopping...since I was already there.

 

Waited in line, a long line (I hate lines, long or short), paid for my stuff, loaded it up and headed for the exit. Same thing at this Walmart as your Costco, couple people at the door wanting to see my receipt and check what's in the cart. I wanted to argue that the checkout person and I just went through this no more than a minute ago...that maybe they should figure out some other type of "theft security" than making me feel like a potential shoplifter. I took the high road, let them do their thing and never went back. I now do that type of shopping online. No driving downtown; no looking for a parking spot; no standing in line and it's delivered to my door...without asking me to go get my picture ID drivers license to make sure I'm the one who's name is on the package.

 

In this age on evolving shopping...I picture a time in the near future when they have a camera system in the big stores where you can virtually walk down the aisles like you do now in a store picking out items and adding them to your cart. Maybe an audio along with that so you can ask the fat guy in the electric cart to move forward just a bit so you can see all the marinara sauce choices!

On hindsight now OneEye, this is exactly how I felt ‘like a potential shoplifter’ you know what scared me the most, that awful walk back into the store, accompanied by the Costco personal, with an audience of-course, the mind races into six-gear, what on earth going to happen now?

 

Look, I go to this wholesale at least once a month, and to my rant of anger, if this super-size, 13 size mukluk cashier, had done her job correctly in the first place, this wouldn’t have happened. (Sorry no disrespects to the obese folks).

 

Arguably, had better days, where a simple innocent days shopping turned out to be an abhorrent attempt on one's persona, especially with all those cameras on you, reminds me of a TV series I watched years ago called, ‘no hiding place’

 

But that said, as I have a membership with Costco, I’m seriously considering having my stuff delivered. A page from your book OneEye. Would save all the belittling inconvenience.

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OneEye

Without water on our planet...life could have never evolved. Water was here before life was here. Chances are that life exists elsewhere in the universe without water...but I highly doubt it's complex life as we know it. With that said...

 

There's a 99.99% chance that the water in that coffee you're drinking right now...passed through a dinosaur at one time. :huh:

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buddy7

Having lived and worked in a developing country as a young man, based on my experience, water being great indispensability, respect is given to water at all times, actually, no one is wasteful of it.

 

While useful for many other things, rainwater is not as pure as you might think, and most definitely should be avoid drinking, and certainly not safe to drink. Rain can wash different types of contaminants into the water you collect (for example, bird poop on your roof could end up in your water barrel or tank) Rainwater can carry bacteria, parasites viruses, and chemicals that could make you sick, and it has been linked to disease outbreaks.

 

The risk of getting sick from rainwater may be different depending on your location, how frequently it rains, the season, and how you collect and store the rainwater. Dust, smoke, and soot from the air can be dissolved in rainwater before it lands on your roof. Roofing materials, gutters, piping, and storage materials can introduce harmful chemicals like asbestos, lead, and copper to the water, though building standards minimize some of this. Dirt and germs can be washed into collected rainwater from the roof, especially when rain follows several days of dry weather.

 

Rain barrels, for example, do not provide any type of disinfection or filtration. Adding chlorine or iodine to water does not protect against chemicals, and some parasites are very chlorine tolerant. Boiling the water will kill germs but will not remove chemicals. Using a simple device called a “first flush diverter” to remove the first water that comes out of the system (which may have been sitting) may help avoid some of these contaminants.

 

Some cisterns, which are common in certain areas, can provide safe water supplies. Some people add purchased, treated water to the rainwater they collect in their cistern. This may make the treated water less safe. Cisterns that are intended for drinking water should be properly maintained.

Consider adding a screen to the water inlet or emptying the rain barrel in less than 10 days to prevent mosquitoes from using the rain barrel as a breeding site. Water intended for drinking needs to be filtered, disinfected, and tested regularly.

 

You probably have heard the stories where African native tribes, drank borehole, stream or river water, and have known to ingest some bacteria i.e. Schistosomiasis, also known as bilharzia, is an infection caused by a parasitic worm that lives in freshwater in subtropical and tropical regions. The parasite is most commonly found throughout Africa but also lives in parts of South America, the Caribbean, the Middle East and Asia.

 

Drinking, Roof-collected rainwater consumption is popular because the public believes that rainwater is pure and safe to drink. But in reality, this is not the case.

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buddy7
 
 
 
 
On 9/21/2019 at 10:15 PM, OneEye said:

Without water on our planet...life could have never evolved. 

There's a 99.99% chance that the water in that coffee you're drinking right now...passed through a dinosaur at one time. :huh:

I served you right, without water on our planet...life could have never evolved.

 

But surely OneEye, our ancestors the Homo sapiens who've been around for some 200,000 years, must have drunk much more of the stuff than we have, and that wasn’t coffee. The hypothesis of ‘the water in that coffee you’re drinking right now passed through a dinosaur at one time’. Seems a little far-fetched? The Earth’s core was probably still cooling-down, I don’t think much water was being drunk at that time. Not even by the dinosaur.

 

Thought I’d chuck that one in! Anecdotal? Or a true fact? Don’t know.

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OneEye

I was quoting a paleontologist from the Science Channel's "How The Universe Works". Meh...wadda they know!

 

As an addendum to this: Water on the earth recycles itself. It constantly evaporates then turns to rain all day long. Water is neither created nor destroyed. The dinosaurs were on this planet for approximately 60 billion 225 million days. You do the math.

Edited by OneEye

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Hammer
On 9/21/2019 at 5:15 PM, OneEye said:

Without water on our planet...life could have never evolved. Water was here before life was here. Chances are that life exists elsewhere in the universe without water...but I highly doubt it's complex life as we know it. With that said...

 

There's a 99.99% chance that the water in that coffee you're drinking right now...passed through a dinosaur at one time. :huh:

That's true OneEye.  Once the Earth began cooling down enough to where live began to come into existence (think amoeba), the amount of water that existed at that point is the same as the amount of water we have today, and yes, we are drinking dinosaur pee.  The water people use to wash their cars with, will be evaporated, then come down as rain somewhere....rain that will fill our reservoirs, and that we will eventually drink.  Water can not be destroyed, it can only be altered (think steam or ice), but it will always come back as some type of water, and that water will eventually find it's way into our drinking water.

 

Think about it....since living creatures came into existence many eons ago, they all consumed water.  If that water didn't evaporate and then re-enter our eco-system, the planet wouldn't have any water left today.  With nearly 8 billion people on the planet today, not to mention all of the other animals that drink water, how much water would all of the people and animals be using up every day?  Okay, so do that for the many eons that all living things were using up that water.  If none of that water had re-entered our eco-system, do you think that any water would be left on the planet?  No, there wouldn't, which is why you are right OneEye.

 

 

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