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popmonstrrr

Type 2 Diabetes for 29 years on oral meds only

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popmonstrrr

Hello,

I come from a large family with most of us being Diabetic while in our youth. I was diagnosed with Type 2 at the age of 16. I am now 45 years old, on oral meds this entire time, and have had zero complications. When pregnant with my 2 kids, I did have to switch over to insulin only but went back to pills after they were born. My A1c's are not stellar, but they are always between 6.6-7.2, with the exception of pregnancy where I was in the lower to mid-5. I attribute that lower number more to strict carb counting than the insulin usage. For a while, I kept having bouts of lows and highs. I was pretty sure that insulin was the next step. Instead I split my doses of Metformin & glipizide to 4 times a day rather than twice a day. It did the trick. I've been increasing my activity this year with hiking and bootcamp. I am going to try Keto again. The first time, I had excellent numbers but then, the excess protein I consumed turned into glucose. My goal is to lose enough weight to see the difference in my A1C #'s. My uncle-in-law was diagnosed with type 2 and now he has stage 4 pancreatic cancer. It's got me a little nervous with how long I've had this. 

 

Thanks for listening! I look forward to learning a bunch.

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adiantum

Welcome to the forum.

All I can add here is my congratulations after 29 years & zero complications.

I had GD when 19 but those were ignorant days & was told to watch my diet.

I had no idea what diet I had to watch so continued stuffing down fruit & bread.

 

Others here know more about meds & keto diet & do keep an eye out for a reply by meyery2 .

His weight loss, with diet & exercise has given wonderful results.

 

I can relate to your nervousness since uncle in law's Dx...it'd scare me too.

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popmonstrrr

Thank you so much for the welcome!

I think I've just been lucky to avoid complications for so long. Like you, when I was diagnosed, there was no direction on how to eat. So as a 16 year old, I avoided sugar, and replaced it with bread & pasta. I would give anything for a do-over. I often wonder if it is the same thing for the newly diagnosed these days. Maybe they are left to research it on their own. I'm so grateful to have all the research at our finger tips. 

I'll be on the look out for meyery2. It's inspiring to see everyone's A1C #'s and weight loss in their signature. Perhaps if I do that, it will be an incentive to stay on track.

May we all thrive : )

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meyery2k

Wow!  29 years.  You will offer a ton of hope.  Welcome!

 

I have been living with diabetes for 3 1/2 years.  Probably much longer since I had not seen a doctor in years but that is for another time.  When I was first diagnosed, my weight was 313 pounds and my A1C was 8.5.  My first fasting glucose test at home was 310 if memory serves.  I test in the 90's regularly now

 

Diabetes motivated me to change things up.  It is in our family.  On my wife's side, there was Big Grandma that had lost her feet.  Nobody wanted to visit her because of the way she looked and smelled.  I know that is a cruel thing to write but it is true.  I did not want to be Big Grandma(er pa) to my children or grandchildren.  I am OCD about my feet and I want to keep them.

 

When I was first diagnosed, I was give a bottle of Metformin, a pat on the back, and some advice about diet (not any good).  I went to Google and figured the best advice would be from people that have diabetes.

 

I found this forum and my friends here helped me turn it around.  I slowly adopted a low carb high fat diet that is pretty close to keto.  I just did anything I could to get my glucose down.  I started walking, then running when I was fit enough.  I discovered that I still hate running but still love riding bicycles.  My weight came off and I lost 100 pounds in one year.  I have kept it off and this 52.5 year old geezer rides a bike 50km nearly daily lol...

 

My A1c is in the 4's regularly and I have been off Metformin for 2 years.  No meds for now.

 

I am thankful to see that it might be possible to be well off 20 or 30 years down this road.  Thank you for sharing!

 

It is a really hot and humid day and I was thinking of taking a rest day but writing this has encouraged me to kit up and go for a ride so I hope to see you around. ~ Mike

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Kit

Hi @popmonstrrr, welcome to the group.

 

I started with an A1C of 10.4 and managed to get it down to 5.2 within 6 months with a keto diet.  Eventually got it down to 4.8, but doctor halved my metformin dose down to 500mg a day, so back up to low 5s.

 

Like you, my family tree is full of diabetics, and I recently watched my brother die a really horrible death from diabetic complications.  It was watching his train wreck which really filled me with determination.

 

After I had my gall bladder removed ~20 years ago, I replaced the fats, and most animal products, with fruits, grains, and other starches, because that was what I was supposed to do.  I was never much of a sugar eater beyond fruit.  Didn't keep me from becoming diabetic.

 

Anyway, good luck on your journey.  I've already nopticed you in some of the older posts so it looks like you're reading the archives.  Tons of good information in there.  Feel free to ask any questions you might have.  There's a ton of good advice here and I'm sure you might have some of your own to give as well.

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popmonstrrr

Thank you Kit! I am so sorry to hear about your brother. I lost my sister in 2004. She was 38 and a type 1 diabetic. It definitely shakes you to your core when you realize how truly terrible this disease can be. I'm glad to hear that your numbers improved.

Like you, I also had my GB removed, though it did nothing for the pain I felt. If I drink liquids with my meal, it can bring about the same pain I had, when my gallstones were first discovered. Experiencing that pain is why the fear of pancreatic cancer has taken hold, I believe.

There is a lot of good info on these forums. I am so glad to have found you guys : )

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popmonstrrr
On 8/22/2019 at 4:56 PM, meyery2k said:

Wow!  29 years.  You will offer a ton of hope.  Welcome!

 

I have been living with diabetes for 3 1/2 years.  Probably much longer since I had not seen a doctor in years but that is for another time.  When I was first diagnosed, my weight was 313 pounds and my A1C was 8.5.  My first fasting glucose test at home was 310 if memory serves.  I test in the 90's regularly now

 

Diabetes motivated me to change things up.  It is in our family.  On my wife's side, there was Big Grandma that had lost her feet.  Nobody wanted to visit her because of the way she looked and smelled.  I know that is a cruel thing to write but it is true.  I did not want to be Big Grandma(er pa) to my children or grandchildren.  I am OCD about my feet and I want to keep them.

 

When I was first diagnosed, I was give a bottle of Metformin, a pat on the back, and some advice about diet (not any good).  I went to Google and figured the best advice would be from people that have diabetes.

 

I found this forum and my friends here helped me turn it around.  I slowly adopted a low carb high fat diet that is pretty close to keto.  I just did anything I could to get my glucose down.  I started walking, then running when I was fit enough.  I discovered that I still hate running but still love riding bicycles.  My weight came off and I lost 100 pounds in one year.  I have kept it off and this 52.5 year old geezer rides a bike 50km nearly daily lol...

 

My A1c is in the 4's regularly and I have been off Metformin for 2 years.  No meds for now.

 

I am thankful to see that it might be possible to be well off 20 or 30 years down this road.  Thank you for sharing!

 

It is a really hot and humid day and I was thinking of taking a rest day but writing this has encouraged me to kit up and go for a ride so I hope to see you around. ~ Mike

Hey there Mike! I didn't see your reply. Wow, you've really made some awesome changes! I know so many people, particularly men, who don't want to face their diagnosis. I had a co-worker, who was in his 30's, and his weight was in the mid to high 300's. He was the head of household and just never bothered to go get his A1C. So his doctor refused his meds and he just didn't care. Mind you, he had a wife and 3 young kids at home. I see this too often, so I truly commend you on the progress you made. Adopting a new lifestyle with food and exercise is not easy for many people. High-five to you and keep inspiring folks.

I hope that my story can give people hope. We can live many years with diabetes and not lose a thing. I know, not all bodies are built the same. I see this in my own family, but, I also know that lifestyle has a lot to do with our outcome. The sister of mine who passed away, rarely ate a home cooked meal, and she was very sedentary. Her complications, never surprised us. My mother, on the other hand, also lived with T2D from the age of 40 until she passed at 80. She battled dementia over the last years of her life, but she left this world with her limbs and eyesight intact. Her memory? Not so much, but the dementia erased the constant pain of losing her daughter. In a way, that may have been a blessing. I have another sister who went off her metformin after doing keto for a year. She lost 100 pounds. She was motivated by a really nasty divorce, but, the plus side, was better health : )

Glad to meet you! Cindy

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dowling gram

Hi popmonstrrr--welcome to the forum

I too had family members who died from diabetes complications. That is what motivated me to change my life. I found that diet is the most important part of keeping my blood glucose under control. I don't think of it as a diet but a lifestyle change.I know diets come and go and they are all the same when it comes to gaining the weight back after you quit and in our case inviting complications. I look at it as something I will do for the rest of my life so I can remain healthy.

 

I was given no instructions when I was diagnosed 5+ years ago but it was suggested I contact the diabetes society. What a joke. Even as uneducated as I was about diabetes then I knew their advice made no sense. I left there vowing never to return. I turned to my computer and found things that did make sense to me. Later I discovered this site and I never looked back. The support and info I get here outweighs anything I can find elsewhere

Edited by dowling gram

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