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The original BOZ

53M Recently Dx’d..workout question..

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The original BOZ

Hello!    

 

53-year-old male here, looking for answers to a question I haven’t seen an answer to. I was just diagnosed on 2 August. 

 

What a kick in the pants!! 

 

Some background:

 

I hadn’t been to the doctor in years, probably 15 or 20. My initial complaint to the doctor was some upper right quadrant pain which coincidentally has nothing to do with diabetes.  I told him I was looking for a physical also since it had been so long.

 

Lo  and behold, my first BG level was  in the 360 range;  second result was 560!  A1c was 13.5.

So I had it for a while.  And aside from peeing a lot, had no other symptoms..I always drank loads of water

 

On 1000 mg Metformin ER daily.

 

I’m in reasonable shape, maybe 25-30 lbs overweight, ( 5’ 11, 215 lbs) but lifting weights (barbell-the big 5, bench, squats, deads, overhead press and rows) along with some HIIT for years..

 

Lots of reading since the diagnosis,and I’m all in with the low carb life; keeping under 75 g carbs/day... usually under 60..Losing weight too

 

So my question.   I get that BG levels for some (me) rise with intense workouts.. but mine seem to go exceptionally high— stairs and hill sprints one day last week made BG level jump tp 169, and weights usually spike up to upper 150’s.   So, way higher than after meals.. typical is 130’s

Workouts happen at 5am, fasted.

 

So,  is this a concern?  Those numbers seem high.  Allay my fears my friends!!

 

Also, glad to have found this forum!

 

Brian, aka BOZ

 

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meyery2k

Perhaps with diet and exercise you can get your BG under control and you will react differently as you adapt to having lower BGs.  I use diet and exercise to keep diabetes under control.  I cycle long distance so I must concede it is a different type of workout.  It might be a good idea to see how you are doing a few months down the road when the changes you are making have had a chance to fully kick in.  It does take some time.

 

Welcome and I hope you stick around. ~ Mike

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dowling gram

Hi Brian--welcome to the forum

 

A low carb diet is excellent to help lower your blood glucose and exercise is good in the long run. This is how the body works. When you do intense exercise first the body uses any available blood glucose and your blood glucose goes down. When more energy is required for prolonged exercise the liver dumps stored glucose. The body doesn't know how much will be required so it is usually more than required so your blood glucose goes up. It will soon go down however and the exercise will help regulate things in the long run. Don't be alarmed by that spike after exercize it means your body is working as it should and that spike unlike others( like overeating carbs) means nothing.

 

You are doing things right so keep it up

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Kit

Hi Boz, welcome to the group.

 

You're definitely getting a liver dump.  One thing you might try is to eat something prior to exercise.  I don't it doesn't sound intuitive, but having something in your stomach might also help minimize that exercise liver dump.

 

You might also consider switching your exercise to later in the day.  Just about anything and everything will raise my BGs in the morning, where in the afternoon and evening I am much steadier and resilient to activity.

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The original BOZ

Thanks for the answers..more to think about.  

I’ll try eating something prior to working out and see how that works..

 

I have tried working out later in the the day, like on weekends or holidays;  horrible horrible.. I have to get it done early or there’s a good chance it won’t get done..besides I’m up at 4 anyway (thanks dogs).. maybe i’ll try again this weekend and see what happens. 

 

Anyway.. again thanks for the answers.  

 

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Hammer

Boz, welcome to the forums!  Something that you need to keep in mind, and this is indicative of what Kit said when she said that everything in the morning will raise her BG levels....your insulin resistance, which is what type 2 diabetes is, varies throughout the day.  You might have higher insulin resistance in the morning, which will result in higher BG readings in the morning, or, you might have higher insulin resistance in the afternoon....or maybe in the evenings.  Since you are new to diabetes, it will take you some time to determine at what times your insulin resistance is higher, and at what times it is lower.  The way to determine this is to keep testing with your meter.

 

As Dowling Gram mentioned, when you exercise, your muscles need glucose to allow you to do the exercise, especially when you lift weights.  Exercising, regardless of what that exercise is, helps to use up the excess glucose that is floating around in your bloodstream.  When you are insulin resistant, your blood cells resist allowing glucose that is floating around in your bloodstream, to enter the blood cells.  When you do a finger prick test to check your BG levels, you are reading that amount of glucose that is floating around in your bloodstream.  When you exercise, that lowers your insulin resistance, and that allows more glucose to enter the blood cells, but that excess glucose isn't enough to satisfy your muscles, so your liver releases more glucose.  Taking a BG reading after exercising will almost always be higher than what you'd want it to be, but the thing is, wait a few hours after finishing your exercising, then take a reading and see what it is.  That extra glucose that was released to nourish your muscles hasn't had time to be used up, so giving it time to be absorbed, should result in lower BG readings.

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1967rs

Sounds similar to how I was diagnosed.  I had this ache right under my ribs on my right side that moved around a bit.  I decided to go in and get an ultrasound just in case it was my liver.  Everything is fine and oh by the way you're a diabetic.   My postprandial BS was like 160 so I guess I found out early.

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The original BOZ

How about an update?

3 month check up was on Nov 6th.  I was down 30 lbs!  Cholesterol/lipids are normal now.

and A1c is down to 6.3 from 13.5 from 3 months ago!  Not bad eh.?

Doc cut my meds cut in 1/2:  down to 500 mg metformin, and 5mg atorvastatin.  Revisit in 3 months.

since then, I’m down another couple pounds....to 176.4 lbs.  I was 165 when I graduated high school a long time ago.

Glucose levels still spike after lifting, but it’s not as bothersome as before.  And the best part? I’m weak as a kitten (/ dr. Hibbert).  (sarcasm).   Yeah losing 30+ lbs is going to affect strength levels, but I’m guessing the very low carb diet is a big part of that too.. oh well..
anyway. That’s what’s up

Brian

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meyery2k

I just came in from a bike ride and this made my day!  Great job!  I have never really lifted weights before so I am not sure how the diet might affect strength.  In cycling I am encouraged to eat 8g of carbs an hour.  I will not.  My goal is glucose control and giving myself simple carbs is not the answer.  I have actually found through informal experimentation on the road that a high fat meal or snack provides an energy boost that lasts longer than one from carbs.  If I have fish and chips, I get a quick burst of energy but it does not last.  If I go to the Chinese restaurant and have roast pork belly, it takes a little more time to get the energy boost from it but it lasts far longer.  My on the road snacks are small bags of macadamia nuts and small packets of peanut butter or almond butter.  I can keep up on a ride and can go all day so I don't listen to anyone as far as consuming carbs.  I have also seen several articles where professional runners and cyclists have adopted low carb/high fat with, to them, surprisingly remarkable results.

 

My thinking is that maybe some energy dense food before you start lifting might help?  My breakfast would horrify a dietician but it gives me strength and endurance.  I have all energy dense food.  Nuts, peanut butter, cheese, and a Slim-Fast or Atkins shake.  I can keep the quantities small.  If I go the bacon and eggs route, I feel a little lag until I get some of that digested off.

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