Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Sign in to follow this  
dowling gram

low carb helps your memory

Recommended Posts

dowling gram

I didn't get a chance to finish somehow it got posted. Here's what I wrote

 

I watched an interesting show tonight on PBS. It was all about memory called Memory Rescue  and how you can avoid dementia. It was given by an eminent psychologist Dr. Daniel G. Amen who has studied the matter extensively.There were more points and ways to improve memory and what to change in your life to improve your brainpower than I can remember but this is the gist of it..

 

Even if you are genetically disposed to dementia there are things you can do to avoid it. I can't remember all that was said but some things were control over blood sugar and blood pressure, stress and inflammation of the body. In order for the brain to remain sharp it has to have a good supply of blood. He suggested Vitamin D and Omega 3 as supplements and suggested foods to include in your diet beets and garlic were 2. He also suggested a diet low in sugar and avoiding grains, potatoes and bread and most fruit. I know it is not exactly low carb but close to it. He also said that losing weight if you are overweight will increase the hearts function and therefore increase blood flow to the brain.

 

Another thing he mentioned moderate exercise is necessary for both the body and the brain as well as keeping your brain active by life long learning or doing activities that make you use your brain.

 

The most impressive thing I got from this show was that our lifestyle is not only keeping diabetes complications at bay it is also keeping our brains healthy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram

Dr. Amen has a few books out that would be worthy of reading if they are anything like his lecture. The one mentioned on the show had the same title as his lecture "memory rescue". It would give you more info if you are interested

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buddy7

I’m all for research, but this time, unfortunately, I’m going completely against the grain here.

A new study found a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet led to improved brain health in mice has sparked hopes carbohydrates could help ward off dementia. University research studies found that feeding mice complex carbohydrates derived from starch, and casein protein, which is found in cheese and milk.

 

They found the diet led to similar protective benefits for the brain, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory.

 

There is currently no effective pharmaceutical treatment for dementia they can slow down the process of the diseases, but we can’t stop it, so it’s exciting that we are starting to identify diets that are impacting how the brain ages.

 

Following century’s worth of existing research identified calorie restriction as the most powerful diet to improve brain health and delay the onset of neurodegenerative disease in rodents.

 

However, the majority of people have a hard time restricting calories, especially in western societies where food is so freely available,

 

It shows a lot of promise that we have been able to replicate the same kind of gene changes in the part of the brain responsible for memory that we also see when we severely restrict calories.

 

As a Type 2 diabetes I do not make a point to ignore calories or denounce carbohydrates, most of my foods are prepared by myself, and I do not specifically have a set diet or stick to one, given by my diabetes DSN who provides good patient care promoting self-care management and administer practises when it comes to dietary for diabetes. Have to say I’m more high protein, high carbohydrates.

 

But there are some rules I do follow for my diabetes, i.e. take your medication, and check your feet every day for cuts, blisters, spots, and swelling.

 

Brush and floss your teeth daily to keep your mouth and gums healthy, don’t smoke

Keep track of your blood sugar, and regular blood pressure checks, 6-month podiatry check, and moderate exercise.

 

The question that puzzles me, some impoverished people rice consumption (starchy carbohydrates) have always been the main diet.  China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Vietnam and the Philippines. Where rice forms a major part of their diet, more than 75% of their daily diets or energy intake are from carbohydrates, where access to protein and fat sources are minimal. Do I need to be concern about my random intake of carbohydrates, with a view of offsetting dementia whenever that time comes?

 

The point I’m trying to raise!

I get rather confused, the countries set out above, and it’s a rarity to see the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults. Can this be contributed to their diet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TX_Clint

In most cases where it's a rarity to see the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults you'll also find hungry though not starving people.

Although this is anecdotal, I found that when I started a low carb keto diet my mental acuity improved noticeably. I also have much more energy and even my mental attitude has improved. I'm much more positive and happy about myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram
Quote

The question that puzzles me, some impoverished people rice consumption (starchy carbohydrates) have always been the main diet.  China, India, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Vietnam and the Philippines. Where rice forms a major part of their diet, more than 75% of their daily diets or energy intake are from carbohydrates, where access to protein and fat sources are minimal. Do I need to be concern about my random intake of carbohydrates, with a view of offsetting dementia whenever that time comes?

 

The point I’m trying to raise!

I get rather confused, the countries set out above, and it’s a rarity to see the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adults. Can this be contributed to their diet?

  •  

 

In the countries you mentioned there is poverty and not an abundance of food. They may eat rice and other carbs but they are not sedentary and walk everywhere they go so there is not obesity, fast or prepared food. The carbs they eat are used as energy so there is little glucose remaining stored in their systems. Our forefathers ate a lot of grain mainly in the form of bread and they worked off their excess glucose and calories.

Today in developed countries we have abundance of food, a lot of fast food and prepared food that is full of sugar and chemicals.

 

Dr. Daniel Amen has 4 health clinics in the USA and has been studying dementia for 30 years. He has taken brain scans of thousands of people before and after following his routine. He showed some. The ones that had dementia or were starting to have it had holes where their brain had died. After following his suggestions those holes mostly filled in.He's not out to make a whole lot of money off of quack pills or treatments that's why he give lectures on what to do and they are things anyone can do without visiting his clinic.

 

To me most of what he says is only common sense to me.

Fact 1. The brain needs a good supply of blood.

Fact 2. High blood sugar. high blood pressure, stress, obesity and inflammation in the body interfere with that good blood flow

Fact 3. A good diet low in carbs with fresh foods is the best diet  to maintain a healthy weight and stay healthy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by dowling gram

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevenal
On 9/7/2019 at 1:27 PM, dowling gram said:

Dr. Amen has a few books out that would be worthy of reading if they are anything like his lecture. The one mentioned on the show had the same title as his lecture "memory rescue". It would give you more info if you are interested

 

I've already read Grain Brain by Dr. Perlmutter. Does Dr. Amen add anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram
Quote

I've already read Grain Brain by Dr. Perlmutter. Does Dr. Amen add anything?

 

Yes I assume he does. Although I've never read "grain brain" I know Dr. Amen gives you ways of improving your brain function besides diet, although diet is part of his book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buddy7

Food for thought

 

it’s always going to be a serious problem within the western society with dementia and heart diseases owing to our habitual and diverse eating habits, course people of the western world do have a hard problem restricting calories, especially in western societies where food is so freely available, whereas completely the opposite to people in developing countries, who basically have not.

 

 

I’m often curious not to see an overweight or obese person from an impoverished country, I’m aware of some of the reasons you already gave poverty, lack of food and being active, which brings me to a point of late, rather you’ve been watching the weekly protesters in Hong Kong, they were over a million protesters at some time, and a point to make, they were not one overweight or obese protester in this feral angry crowd, but having said that, they were mostly of a college student age.

 

 

So, it may, therefore, be inferred that women and men without their land performed more work in paddy cultivation (rice fields) than the women and men of higher socioeconomic strata. In developing countries, one-third of the total population are peasant men and women. These men and women mainly work on their land to produce food for their family, a true existence even for western society, in different occupations of course.

 

 

However, it would be disingenuous of me to think the Asian population on a whole, all are on the bread-line and they do not suffer the same ailments as we in western society, one suspects overweight or obesity differs across a spectrum of ethnicity and diversity.

 

 

I had the chance to watch 2 videos on YouTube of Dr Daniel. G. Amen found them very interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.