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Kit

Hyperinsulinemia

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Kit

This has been on my mind for the last year or two, but I haven't had much time to research it.  Today work has been a series of hurry up and wait forever, so I had some idle time and came up with a better search than I had before.

 

Hyperinsulinemia and heart disease

and I got a number of hits.

 

Added sugars drive coronary heart disease via insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia

https://openheart.bmj.com/content/4/2/e000729.full

 

Hyperinsulinemia and the Risk of Cardiovascular Death and Acute Coronary and Cerebrovascular Events in Men

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/415831

 

Hyperinsulinemia Predicts Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Healthy Middle Aged Men

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.cir.98.5.398

 

Insulin Resistance/Compensatory Hyperinsulinemia, Essential Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Disease

https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/88/6/2399/2845154

 

I'm still doing a lot of reading, but I'm curious on what others think.

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Kit

I didn't have a chance to do much searching last night.  Does anyone remember which study it was doctors love to quote where aggressive BG control actually saw an uptick in heart attacks?  They actually ended the study early because of it.  I can't remember the name and none of the keywords I've been entering have helped.  I want to check and see if I can find what methods they were using to lower blood glucose levels.  I am especially curious if there were using drugs which stimulated insulin secretion.

 

I've heard a few times (I need to find where I read this again) that most people who suffer from heart heart disease are actually hyperinsulinemic.

 

Cholesterol is in part a repair mechanism.  LDL carries cholesterol to areas of the body that need repair and HDL carries it back away again.  This would make a high LDL a symptom of a deeper problem instead of the problem itself, which is how the majority of the medical community currently treat it.

 

Now I am not trying to say that high blood glucose levels don't also cause damage, it obviously does.

 

This might also be the case on why many people note that T2s suffer from complications much more readily than T1s, who don't suffer from hyperinsulinemia.  

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Kit

Managed to do some reading during lunch.

 

The article mentioned that one of the studies it discussed (ADVANCE) used gliclazide plus whatever else was necessary to lower numbers.  So at least that study was pushing the subjects to make more of their own insulin, increasing hyperinsulinemia.

 

Add to it, the article also mentions that subject in the intensive therapy section of the ACCORD study gained significant weight on average (10 KG or 22lbs) which says to me that they were either giving subjects insulin and/or medications which stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin).

 

The flaws in these studies keep standing out to me.  Its like none of them even consider the possibility of other changes other than throwing more meds at it and see what happens.

 

It was suggested to me to read some items from Dr Fung, as he addresses some of this is his writings.  I've already been looking into some of Dr Kraft's work, though what I have read so far as mostly centered around diagnosing diabetes.

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Kit

I found the med list for the ACCORD study.

 

https://www.ajconline.org/article/S0002-9149(07)00439-0/fulltext

 

Quote

All ACCORD participants are provided with education regarding diet and lifestyle, glucose monitoring and therapy, and the avoidance and treatment of hypoglycemia. They are also provided with antidiabetic medications from a formulary of drugs, as well as glucose-monitoring equipment. The ACCORD formulary contains the following drugs, representing several classes of antihyperglycemic agents: glimepiride (a sulfonylurea), repaglinide (a rapid-acting secretagogue), metformin (a biguanide), rosiglitazone (a thiazolidinedione), acarbose (an α-glucosidase inhibitor), glargine, neutral protamine Hagedorn and premixed insulins (longer-acting insulins), and aspart and regular insulin (shorter-acting insulins).

 

I had to look most of them up, but most of it is either insulin or insulin stimulating drugs.  Only a couple work by other methods.

 

Strategies used to intensify glycemic control

Quote

•Interact with participants at least once per month in person and/or on the phone

•Reinforce lifestyle and behavioral issues and increment pharmacotherapy at each visit

•Teach and encourage self-titration of insulin and oral agents to achieve capillary goals (at least once per week)

•Review and reinforce adherence at each visit

•Schedule intensive-group participant visits on the same day

•Consider group visits with intensive-group participants to reinforce self-care and allow participants to share experiences

•Add or increment therapy at every visit if the point-of-care or central laboratory HbA1c level is ≥6% or if >50% of premeal capillary glucose levels are >100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) or postmeal levels are >140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L)

•Encourage self-monitoring ≥2 times/day if not on insulin and ≥4 times/day if on insulin

•Add and optimize metformin use early

•Start with evening glargine insulin as the basal insulin and target fasting capillary glucose ≤100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L)

•Increment insulin doses by ≥10% of total daily dose regularly

•Consider adding prandial aspart insulin if >0.5 U/kg of basal insulin is being used and glycemic targets remain unmet

•Add a thiazolidinedione (rosiglitazone) early

•Do not stop or reduce any therapy when adding or incrementing another one

•Review each participant’s HbA1c level in team meetings at least weekly

•Contact participants to increment therapy on the phone if a central laboratory HbA1c level ≥6% is reported if not incremented at the visit when it was drawn

 

The study claims they also taught lifestyle changes.  I need to see if I can get any details of that area, but I bet you its the same stuff we're all told, 40-60% carbs, little to no fat, etc etc etc.  Which, as I'm sure most of us know, means high numbers and lots of drugs.  In fact they specifically say "do not stop or reduce any therapy when adding or incrementing another one".

 

And while trying to search for other information, I ran across this

 

Too much insulin a bad thing for the heart?

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100419233109.htm

I need to hunt down the original source material.

 

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Kit

Ran across this video that I felt was interesting.

 

Insulin vs Keytones - The Battle for Brown Fat

 

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stevenal
On 10/1/2019 at 4:43 PM, Kit said:

Only a couple work by other methods.

Please share. Metformin and... ?

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Kit
1 hour ago, stevenal said:

Please share. Metformin and... ?

 

 

Here's the break down

 

glimepiride (a sulfonylurea) - stimulates insulin secretion

 

repaglinide (a rapid-acting secretagogue) - stimulates insulin secretion

 

metformin (a biguanide) - works in the liver to ease insulin resistance and calm liver dumps of glucose.

 

rosiglitazone (a thiazolidinedione) - Aka Avandia.  Lowers insulin resistance.  I see a note that it was banned in UK and EU due to risks of increased risks of heart attack and stroke!

https://www.nhs.uk/news/diabetes/avandia-diabetes-drug-suspended/

 

acarbose (an α-glucosidase inhibitor) - slows food digestion

 

glargine - Lantus (insulin)

 

neutral protamine Hagedorn and premixed insulins (longer-acting insulins) - Insulins
and aspart and regular insulin (shorter-acting insulins). - Insulins

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Kit

One thing that gets me in the above video. So much so that it was the first thing on my mind when I woke up this morning. 

 

The reason I felt like the doctors were not doing anything to improve my brothers situation was because they weren't. They waited until he got bad enough go on dialysis, put him on the treatment, and then just made sure that treatment worked. No one ever focused on improving his situation. Sadly that also included himself. 

 

It bothers me so much. 

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janice21475

Kit, In my Husband's case the Doctors focused on lowering his Blood Sugar but their primary complaint was always that he smoked. In actuality, the majority of his calorie intake came from sugar. But the target was cigarettes.  I don't focus on it too much as it only serves to sadden me and add to my distrust of Doctors.

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Kit
1 minute ago, janice21475 said:

Kit, In my Husband's case the Doctors focused on lowering his Blood Sugar but their primary complaint was always that he smoked. In actuality, the majority of his calorie intake came from sugar. But the target was cigarettes.  I don't focus on it too much as it only serves to sadden me and add to my distrust of Doctors.

 

The best description I have for my brother. 

 

He was swerving down a highway at 200mph.  The doctors treated him by trying to keep him from going off the road or slamming into a wall instead of showing down the car. 

 

The problem with that method is that eventually he's going to slam into that wall anyway. 

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meyery2k

I believe the push for carbs is simply criminal.  I am not much on conspiracy theories but, if you follow the money on this one, you could see where soft drink manufacturers, large scale food manufacturers, and industries related to corn and wheat would profit enormously.  Cheap food they turn around and profit enormously on.

 

The reason I lump soft drink manufacturers in this lot is simply because they market to children and teens.  When I was in high school the big excitement was when they installed the Pepsi vending machine.  Of course we all then bought Pepsi.

 

Oh yeah, in spite of 3+ years on low carb I still get an earful from some people about how carbs would be good for me.  My observation, directly disproves that.

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Kit

I mentioned this in a previous thread, but I should put it here to since it very much applies.

 

The medical community does not use the scientific method.  They use something called evidence based medicine.  It sounds good until you realize some of its flaws.

 

If a study has never been performed to show that X is helpful to Y condition, it is treated as if studies were performed to show that X doesn't help Y condition.  This actively leads to bias in the community and doctors giving their patients horrible advice.

 

An engineer or physicist would NEVER be able to get away with that.  Crap like that would ruin their professional reputations if not their careers.

 

And I will be honest.  How much money do you think is made per year on statins?

According to this article from 2011, the number was $35 Billion.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/8267876/Statins-the-drug-firms-goldmine.html

 

To make that number easier to digest, that is $35,000,000,000

 

How much money do you think there is to be made in telling people to stop eating sugars and processed foods?

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dowling gram

The trouble with medical studies is they are done to retain funding and they don't take all factors into consideration. If nothing is published they lose their funding so they only consider 1 fact and not others that may be relevant. Hence we have eggs or other things are bad for you and a few years later they're good for you.

 

I agree with Mike. Too often our diets and medicines are controlled by big food manufacturers and big Pharma

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