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sweetstar

Med advice/info needed

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sweetstar

I have been a member here for several years.  There are many ups and downs with this disease.  I am in a down.

Although recently the doctors seem to believe that an A1C  at 7. is okay, I would really like to get back to 6.0

I have been struggling with Carb cravings and really can't seem to get back where I was.

So, I currently take Metformin ER,1500 per day, and Glimperide twice a day.  I have been thinking in might be time to take something else,

but don't know what is best, safest, easiest to take.

Any suggestions and/or experiences are appreciated.  I want to be informed when I talk to the doctor.

Thank you.

 

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Kit

I know this is not the answer you want, but the only way I have found to diminish or eliminate carb cravings is to force yourself to stop eating them for a significant period of time (I'm talking months).  After that, you just loose your taste for them.  That's what worked for me.  Nothing else would.

 

With the research I have done, I have determined I will not take glip or similar medications that push your pancreas to produce more insulin.

 

You might consider the SGLT2 class of drugs that prevent the kidneys from reabsorbing glucose from the urine back into our systems.  Basically you pee out excess sugar.  This has the benefit of not raising worsening hyperinsulinemia (a subject I have been interested in lately).  However, they also have their own side affects, as do most diabetes drugs.

 

You don't want to take them if you have kidney disease.

They can increase the probability of UTI infections (bacteria love that sugar)

I have heard cases of Forxiga causing DKA.  We had one here on our forums and I know of one other.  BG levels were normal at the time too.

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keenast

Try to analyze the food you eat - what is it that keeps your levels up? Delete it from your kitchen. The cravings will diminish for sure! My fantastic wife bakes bread as well as cake for me once a week, no sugar involved of any kind, even artificial. The cake (4 portions) has 1 small pieces of very very dark chocolate mixed inside that's it - besides that, cake and bread is the same - almond flower and eggs. That covers my cravings. 

Hang on in !

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dowling gram

I agree that switching diabetes meds won't curb the carb cravings. Only doing without excessive carbs will do that. However there are ways to fool those carb cravings. I make low carb cookies when I have a craving for something sweet. There is usually a low carb recipe for almost everything. You just have to find it and make it yourself.

 

A word about those meds that cause you to urinate excess sugar. That excess sugar causes UTI infections. I know someone who was on them and they had constant infections. That makes sense to me when I heard it. Bacteria feed on sugar.

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meyery2k

My own experience has been that replacing simple carbohydrates with complex carbohydrates worked out really well for me.  I can always season my vegetables or salads.  A handful of nuts, always gives them some zing and fills me up.

 

Only on the odd occasion will I have cake or something.  I am often disappointed by it now.  If I am going to indulge, it better be good lol...

 

Some might disagree but there are some excellent no sugar added ice cream products.  They are high in carbs but, perhaps, in moderation they can work for you.

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Hammer

Sweetstar, what the others have said is true, carbs are addictive...the more you eat, the more you crave, so to stop your carb cravings, you need to avoid carbs.  I know that doing that is not easy, and if you do cut way back on your carbs, you might get what we call the "carb flu", which is how your body feels when you cut way back on carbs.  You almost feel like you have the flu, but it's your body adjusting to the lowered carb consumption.  Once your body adapts to the lowered carb consumption, you will feel better, you will have more energy, you will lose weight, and your BG levels will drop, which will result in a lower A1c.

 

There is another alternative, which I don't recommend, but if you started using insulin, you could keep your BG levels down to normal levels, regardless of what you eat.  I use insulin, both a basal insulin, which lowers my fasting glucose levels, and a bolus insulin, which lowers my after meal glucose levels.  Using both types of insulin, I could eat whatever I wanted to and just take the correct amount of insulin to cover the glucose rise that would result in eating those foods.  The thing is, doing that is dangerous, which is why I said that I don't recommend doing this.  While I can eat whatever I want and cover it with insulin, I don't eat whatever I want, I still adhere to a low carb/high fat diet, because doing otherwise is dangerous.  The reason that it's dangerous is simple...I know how much insulin I need to take for XXX amount of carbs.  What I don't know is how many carbs are in the food that I'm going to eat.  If I went to an ice cream parlor and ordered a banana split, how many carbs are in that banana split?  I don't know because if you look up a banana split's nutritional content, you get an average of what is in it, but when the person makes that banana split, he/she might give you a larger banana, larger scoops of ice cream, extra whipped cream, etc, so you don't know how many carbs are in that banana split.  By the same token, the person making that banana split might give you a smaller banana, smaller scoops of ice cream, and less whipped cream.  If you based your insulin dose on what the nutritional information you found, you might take too much or too little insulin.  Taking too little insulin isn't a problem, since you can test 2 hours after you've eaten the banana split, and if your BG levels are too high, you just a second shot of insulin to get those BG levels down.  If you took too much insulin, your BG levels would drop too low, and you'd suffer a hypo, which isn't fun.

 

Also, eating lots of carbs and taking lots of insulin will cause you to gain weight.  Excessive insulin will make your body retain weight, as will the excessive number of carbs.  Insulin is not for everybody, which is why it's better to just reduce your carb intake instead of using insulin.

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