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OneEye

HD DVD Recording...

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OneEye

Got a problem out here in California. The electrical God (PG&E) started a fire in November that wiped out 18,000+ homes, killed 85 people and virtually wiped 90% of the town of Paradise off the map. What PG&E is now doing is shutting off power whenever the wind kicks up. 2 days, the shortest time, 6 days...the most. Bought a nice loud generator, but...when the electricity goes out...so does my Comcast TV/Internet cable.

 

A friend in Wyoming mailed me a box of DVDs. 103 of them...to be exact. The box weighed 24 lbs. That's a buncha movies. A nice "Christmassy" thing to do. Here's the rub. I'm a High Definition guy. I've got one eye that still kinda works and HD is all I'll watch. Honestly, going from SD to HD was like going from black & white to color. My DVD player plays SD DVDs and doesn't record...I'll have to upgrade. Here's my question:

 

If I buy an HD DVD recorder...can I rent a movie from my IP and record it with my DVD recorder? I'm not talking about the legal aspects of this...I'm talking about the physical aspects. Does Comcast send out a signal along with the movie rental that blocks it from being recorded? If there is a God...I'll deal with the morality issues in this when if we talk.

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buddy7
 
 
 
 
On 12/14/2019 at 9:35 PM, OneEye said:

If I buy an HD DVD recorder...can I rent a movie from my IP and record it with my DVD recorder? I'm not talking about the legal aspects of this...I'm talking about the physical aspects. Does Comcast send out a signal along with the movie rental that blocks it from being recorded? If there is a God...I'll deal with the morality issues in this when if we talk.

OneEye! I’m talking UK gadgetry here, years ago when I rented VHS films from the high street shops, probably before DVDs came along, when I rented a good VHS film, I always wanted to do a few copy’s and circulated them to family members. But the recording gear I had at the time, just won’t let me do it. Of course, since then DVD recording gadgetry has got much more sophisticated these days. With the current technology doubt rather you can do any recording, you’ll be just killing the DVD industry.


So recently I purchased a complete music centre, which does about everything, apart from washing the dishes, so I don’t have a reason to record things these days, and I rarely buy DVDs having Netflix.


Best of luck my friend.
Sorry to hear about the horrid fires you’ve been having!

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buddy7
On 12/14/2019 at 9:35 PM, OneEye said:

Got a problem out here in California. The electrical God (PG&E) started a fire in November that wiped out 18,000+ homes, killed 85 people and virtually wiped 90% of the town of Paradise off the map. What PG&E is now doing is shutting off power whenever the wind kicks up. 2 days, the shortest time, 6 days...the most. Bought a nice loud generator, but...when the electricity goes out...so does my Comcast TV/Internet cable.

 

A friend in Wyoming mailed me a box of DVDs. 103 of them...to be exact. The box weighed 24 lbs. That's a buncha movies. A nice "Christmassy" thing to do. Here's the rub. I'm a High Definition guy. I've got one eye that still kinda works and HD is all I'll watch. Honestly, going from SD to HD was like going from black & white to color. My DVD player plays SD DVDs and doesn't record...I'll have to upgrade. Here's my question:

 

If I buy an HD DVD recorder...can I rent a movie from my IP and record it with my DVD recorder? I'm not talking about the legal aspects of this...I'm talking about the physical aspects. Does Comcast send out a signal along with the movie rental that blocks it from being recorded? If there is a God...I'll deal with the morality issues in this when if we talk.

OneEye! I’m talking UK gadgetry here, years ago when I rented VHS films from the high street shops, probably before DVDs came along, when I rented a good VHS film, I was always wanted to do a few copy’s and circulated them to family members. But the recording gear I had at the time, just won’t let me do it. Of course, since the DVD recording gadgetry have got much more sophisticated these days. With the current technology doubt rather you can do any recording, you’ll be just killing the DVD industry.

So recently I purchased a complete music centre, which does about everything, apart from washing the dishes, so I don’t have a reason to record things these days, and I rarely buy DVDs having Netflix.

 

Best of luck my friend.

 

Sorry to hear about the horrid fires you’ve been having!

Edited by buddy7

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Hammer

OneEye, there is no DVD recorder that will record an HD DVD movie so that it will be recorded.  I have a VCR/DVD recorder connected to my cable provider, and with that, I can record (in standard definition), anything that that my cable provider gives me.  I also have an HD cable box that will record any HD program that my cable provider offers.  By having my DVD/VCR recorder connected to my DVR, I can watch the recorded HD program, while I am recording it to a standard definition DVD.  I have done this many times, and it is not illegal.  You are allowed to make a copy of any TV, cable program, or whatever movie or show, as long as you only make one copy of it.  It's no different than if you were to make a VCR copy of some TV show or movie, so that you can watch it at a later date....it's called time shifting.  The problem now is that, you need to get a VCR/DVD recorder that will do this, and they no longer make those devices. (I have three), so if you can find one of these devices that will allow you to do what you want to do, you can record whatever you want to a DVD.  Just to mention, even though I can't record a movie or TV show in HD, the VCR/DVD recorder records the show, movie, program, whatever, that looks like it's in HD.

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OneEye
7 hours ago, buddy7 said:

Sorry to hear about the horrid fires you’ve been having!

 

Was terrible. 11,000+ homes destroyed; 18,000+ structures and 85 people burned alive...some of them in their cars gridlocked trying to escape. President Trump gave us a visit. Said that he felt sorry for the town of Pleasure...and was quickly corrected, "It's Paradise, Mr. President!" Then went on to say that Pleasure was now no paradise and the federal government was on the way to help. Later, back at the White House, he said there wouldn't be any federal help...that the people of Paradise should have been out raking leaves in the forest, not mentioning that 57% of California's 33 million acres of forest are controlled by the federal government.

 

"Come on out, Donald...grab a rake!"

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buddy7
8 hours ago, OneEye said:

 

Was terrible. 11,000+ homes destroyed; 18,000+ structures and 85 people burned alive...some of them in their cars gridlocked trying to escape. President Trump gave us a visit. Said that he felt sorry for the town of Pleasure...and was quickly corrected, "It's Paradise, Mr. President!" Then went on to say that Pleasure was now no paradise and the federal government was on the way to help. Later, back at the White House, he said there wouldn't be any federal help...that the people of Paradise should have been out raking leaves in the forest, not mentioning that 57% of California's 33 million acres of forest are controlled by the federal government.

 

"Come on out, Donald...grab a rake!"

“The Donald”, tends to change his mind like a chameleon lizard changes its colours, He generally says something in the morning, by the afternoon, changes his mind.

Can’t be trusted.

Never liked lizards that much!

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Hammer
On 12/16/2019 at 10:39 AM, buddy7 said:

OneEye! I’m talking UK gadgetry here, years ago when I rented VHS films from the high street shops, probably before DVDs came along, when I rented a good VHS film, I was always wanted to do a few copy’s and circulated them to family members. But the recording gear I had at the time, just won’t let me do it. Of course, since the DVD recording gadgetry have got much more sophisticated these days. With the current technology doubt rather you can do any recording, you’ll be just killing the DVD industry.

 

There are software programs that will copy DVD movies, as well as anything that you can stream on your computer, but any program that will copy a movie DVD is illegal to have on your computer in the US.  There are a number of programs that will allow you to copy a DVD movie, but again, they are illegal here in the states.  I believe one is called DVD Cloner, and another is called DVD Fab, and there was another one that was free, and I think it was called DVD Shrink, but I'm not sure.  If you are using a Windows computer, and you are using Chrome as your internet browser, there is a plugin call Video Download Helper.  If you install Video Download Helper, it will allow you to download any video that you can see on YouTube as well as other sources.

 

If I am watching a video on Amazon Prime, and if I want to save that video, I use a software program called Movavi Video Suite.  That suite of programs has a program that will record whatever I see on my screen, so if I want to watch a movie on Amazon Prime, I just launch Movavi Video suite, and select the Video Capture program, turn it on, then start the movie, and Movavi will record the entire program.

 

To be honest, if there is a movie that I want, I would prefer to just buy it, if it's available, but sometimes, it's not available for purchase, so I have to do a streaming download and record it as I am watching it.  I don't want to cheat anyone, but if I pay to watch it on Amazon, then I feel like I should be able to record it, in the event that I want to watch it again....which I rarely do.

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OneEye
13 hours ago, TX_Clint said:

I feel for you OneEye. What's the state of California doing about the situation? I surely wouldn't count on the feds to do much.

 

I could get into that...but I've been warned to stay away from any further political rhetoric.

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ran23

DVD Shrink 3.2 and it needs Nero to work.  My XP PC was set up for that.  Too bad that trial version of Nero no longer works. DVD Shrink does work on Win 10.  

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OneEye
1 hour ago, Hammer said:

I don't want to cheat anyone, but if I pay to watch it on Amazon, then I feel like I should be able to record it, in the event that I want to watch it again....which I rarely do.

 

I feel the same way. It's not like I'm pirating the movie to make copies and sell them. I'm sure arguments could be made for both sides of this.

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OneEye
6 minutes ago, ran23 said:

DVD Shrink 3.2 and it needs Nero to work.  My XP PC was set up for that.  Too bad that trial version of Nero no longer works. DVD Shrink does work on Win 10.  

 

I had a Nero DVD install disc at one time. Have no idea where it's at now. To top that...the CD/DVD player in my Dell GX280 doesn't read DVDs anymore. Maybe I'll try a taller antenna!

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buddy7
15 hours ago, Hammer said:

There are software programs that will copy DVD movies, as well as anything that you can stream on your computer, but any program that will copy a movie DVD is illegal to have on your computer in the US.  There are a number of programs that will allow you to copy a DVD movie, but again, they are illegal here in the states.  I believe one is called DVD Cloner, and another is called DVD Fab, and there was another one that was free, and I think it was called DVD Shrink, but I'm not sure.  If you are using a Windows computer, and you are using Chrome as your internet browser, there is a plugin call Video Download Helper.  If you install Video Download Helper, it will allow you to download any video that you can see on YouTube as well as other sources.

 

If I am watching a video on Amazon Prime, and if I want to save that video, I use a software program called Movavi Video Suite.  That suite of programs has a program that will record whatever I see on my screen, so if I want to watch a movie on Amazon Prime, I just launch Movavi Video suite, and select the Video Capture program, turn it on, then start the movie, and Movavi will record the entire program.

 

To be honest, if there is a movie that I want, I would prefer to just buy it, if it's available, but sometimes, it's not available for purchase, so I have to do a streaming download and record it as I am watching it.  I don't want to cheat anyone, but if I pay to watch it on Amazon, then I feel like I should be able to record it, in the event that I want to watch it again....which I rarely do.

And, I do feel the same way, my view is when you set out to buy something, in my opinion, it becomes one's property, why? My money paid for it, which gives me the right, to choose and used it, to what, or any purpose suits me.

 

But what does annoys me, when a licit cause asserts or averts that given right to own something, without further expenditure.

 

Anyway thanks for the input.

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Hammer
On 12/17/2019 at 2:24 PM, OneEye said:

 

I had a Nero DVD install disc at one time. Have no idea where it's at now. To top that...the CD/DVD player in my Dell GX280 doesn't read DVDs anymore. Maybe I'll try a taller antenna!

Just a thought OneEye, but does the CD/DVD drawer open when you push in the eject button on the front of the drive?  If it does, then the CD/DVD drive is getting power, if it doesn't open, check the power cable going to it.  If it opens, but it just won't read the CD/DVD, check to see that the data cable on the back of the drive hasn't come loose.  Maybe unplug the data cable, then plug it back in.

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meyery2k

Some first hand experience from the telecom business.

 

This subject rears up when sites want to either play the radio or a commercially produced CD to callers on hold and/or over the PA system.

 

The argument from ASCAP and BMI is that while you are purchasing a physical medium (at least in the old days), you are also agreeing to abide by the licensing under which the content has been provided.  The letter and spirit of the law would be that you would use this for personal enjoyment or to enhance a party, and so forth.  You are not gaining anything using the content in this manner.

 

When you play the radio over your music on hold or PA system it then becomes considered a rebroadcast for commercial purposes because it is being used to increase the revenue of your business by enhancing a customer's experience with your business.

 

You are allowed to make a copy of your content for archival purposes.

 

Every so often one of our customers that ignores this will get a "you better stop or else" letter.  I have personally never seen the consequences of ignoring these but have heard/read of some anecdotes where a lawsuit has been filed.  Whether true or not, I cannot say.

 

In many cases, the music you hear in a chain store, is delivered and paid for monthly.  It is now done online.  Back in the old days, Muzak or some other firm would install a tape and change it every so often.  You can also find music not subject to royalties but it is generally not very popular for mass broadcasting (think of old school elevator music).

 

I remember reading an article in which Pete Townshend of "The Who" was delighted at how easy it became to pirate and distribute music.  He felt it was payback to the production companies for all the cheating of royalties to the artists over the years.  

 

I can't comment on the morality of any of it.  I simply don't know enough of either side.  It is complicated, messy, law though...

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OneEye
2 hours ago, Hammer said:

Just a thought OneEye, but does the CD/DVD drawer open when you push in the eject button on the front of the drive?  If it does, then the CD/DVD drive is getting power, if it doesn't open, check the power cable going to it.  If it opens, but it just won't read the CD/DVD, check to see that the data cable on the back of the drive hasn't come loose.  Maybe unplug the data cable, then plug it back in.

 

Funny that. Door opens, door closes with the DVD. Then...nothing. I put in a DVD lens cleaner that showed on the screen...but after the clean no DVD would play. I'd open up the Dell case and fuss with the data cable but this thing has a penchant to go wonky on me once opened and throw a case intrusion error code on the screen. I'd rather not dick around with that.

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OneEye
2 hours ago, meyery2k said:

I can't comment on the morality of any of it.  I simply don't know enough of either side.  It is complicated, messy, law though...

 

I get it. I get that artists want to protect their product and producers want their share of the pie. I get that "renting" something has a limited "time factor". You can't just rent a house and live in it for free from the second month on. The same with buying media. I don't expect to buy a movie and then show it for profit without giving the creators their share. I also don't expect to go to a movie house, pay admission to watch a film...and expect to come back and watch it again without paying once again for the seat. But...

 

We're talking me paying for a rental movie and recording it so I can watch it again when I wish. Heck, when I rent a movie from Comcast, it's mine to watch for the next 48 to 72 hours. That's 24 to 36 times! Thanks for the offer...but no one watches a movie over and over for 2 to 3 days. I'll record that and stretch out that time...thank you very much. Never used to be that way with Comcast. In 1997, when I joined Comcast...if you wanted to watch a movie you called a certain number and then the movie played once on your TV. That was it. I've been with these guys 22 years. C'mon...cut me some slack! I'm already paying you thieves over $200 a month as it is! Sheeesh...

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buddy7
 
 
 
 
14 hours ago, OneEye said:

..but no one watches a movie over and over for 2 to 3 days

 

Really! With over 200 bought DVDs copies and 3 DVD recorders in my spare rooms, the dear lady sticks to watching one DVD all the time. There are several reasons why I love the movie, I love the storyline, and two people meet on holiday fell in love and the tears flow from then on. If it so happens to be on when I enter the room, my cop-out, read my ongoing book or magazine, until the movie finishes. This could happen 2-3 times a week. It's never a good idea of putting a DVD recorder in a bedroom.😍

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buddy7
14 hours ago, OneEye said:

 

I get it. I get that artists want to protect their product and producers want their share of the pie. I get that "renting" something has a limited "time factor". You can't just rent a house and live in it for free from the second month on. The same with buying media. I don't expect to buy a movie and then show it for profit without giving the creators their share. I also don't expect to go to a movie house, pay admission to watch a film...and expect to come back and watch it again without paying once again for the seat. But...

 

We're talking me paying for a rental movie and recording it so I can watch it again when I wish. Heck, when I rent a movie from Comcast, it's mine to watch for the next 48 to 72 hours. That's 24 to 36 times! Thanks for the offer...but no one watches a movie over and over for 2 to 3 days. I'll record that and stretch out that time...thank you very much. Never used to be that way with Comcast. In 1997, when I joined Comcast...if you wanted to watch a movie you called a certain number and then the movie played once on your TV. That was it. I've been with these guys 22 years. C'mon...cut me some slack! I'm already paying you thieves over $200 a month as it is! Sheeesh...

Really! With over 200 bought DVDs copies and 3 DVD recorders in my spare rooms, the dear lady sticks to watching one DVD all the time. There are several reasons why I love the movie, I love the storyline, and two people meet on holiday fell in love and the tears flow from then on. If it so happens to be on when I enter the room, my cop-out, read my ongoing book or magazine, until the movie finishes. This could happen 2-3 times a week. It's never a good idea of putting a DVD recorder in a bedroom.

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Hammer
6 hours ago, buddy7 said:

 It's never a good idea of putting a DVD recorder in a bedroom.

I don't have a DVD recorder in my bedroom, heck I don't even have a TV in my bedroom, but that still doesn't work for me, because now, I just fall asleep in front of my computer, or my basement family room TV.☺️

 

I think that the average person who might copy a DVD movie or music CD, is tired of being ripped off by the entertainment industry.  A few examples of that....years ago, I wanted to make a music CD mix of songs that I titled, "Music to Drive Fast To", which I later changed to, "Music To Wake You Up".  All of the songs were fast tempo songs that would get your heart rate up.  There was one song that I wanted to include on the CD, but I was surprised that I didn't have it in my collection, so I went to buy it.  The song was "Born To Be Wild" by Steppenwolf, which I'm sure most of the members here know, so I went to Fry's Electronics to buy the CD.  Now keep in mind that this album had been out for 40 years when I bought it at Fry's.  The price was $20....for an old album?  The record companies say that they charge prices that will help them recover what it cost to make the album and to advertise the album.  Does that mean that they hadn't recovered that money in 40 years?....for an album that was extremely popular when it was released?  That CD should have been in the $5 bin.

 

The next rip off was a DVD movie, "Open Water".  Typically, the price of an item reflects what it costs to make that item...a Cadillac costs a lot more that a Chevy Spark, since it costs a lot more to make the Cadillac.  Okay, so why does a movie like "Open Water" cost $20 to buy, when it only cost $7 million dollars to make?  It also cost $20 to buy the movie Avatar, which cost $260 million to make.  How can the movie industry justify charging $20 for both movies?  The entertainment industry is happy to rip you off, but if you try to rip them off, they want you to be fined and to go to jail.

 

Here is something that I think that I have mentioned here before....it's illegal to copy a DVD movie, but it's okay to copy that same movie from your TV using a DVD recorder.  If you have a DVD recorder connected to your cable box, and you want to record a movie that's on Showtime, or HBO, or any other premium cable channel, you just put a blank DVD in the DVD recorder, and set it to record the program, just like you'd do with a VCR...it's perfectly legal.  The end result is that you have a perfect digital copy of the movie, but if you copy the movie from a DVD, it is illegal because of the way it was copied....that makes no sense to me.  If you watched the DVD that you copied, alongside the DVD that you made by recording the movie from your cable box, there would be no difference, so why is one legal and the other illegal?

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OneEye

@Hammer...

I'm a rule guy, kinda. I'm okay with rules...unless they don't seem logical or they're a rule that obviously benefits one and not the rest.

 

I get that creators want to protect their creations. If I buy a pack o' noodles and some cheese at the grocery store and cook it up...is Kraft Foods going to sue me for Mac & Cheese copyright infringement? No! If I try and box that up and pass it off as Kraft Mac & Cheese at the flea market do they have a case? Absolutely!

 

When you're grown...you're expected to think like a grown up...on the fly. How do you know if something's wrong? You should be able to feel it. Wrong doesn't feel right! If someone's taken to delivering me a movie over the cable that I'm paying to see...and I can capture that movie to watch at a later date? Then, it's technology that's at fault here...not me. You're a multi-billion-dollar entity. You don't want someone copying your cable movies...spend some cash to see that can't happen, technology-wise, don't threaten me with some lame copyright law. You come bang on my door yelling something about copyright laws and you want to seize all my stuff...I suggest you wear a Kevlar vest!

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Hammer

OneEye, I don't know if you remember this, but years ago, Sony tried to place some type of copy protection on their music CDs so that they couldn't be copied.  The copy protection ended up damaging CD players and CD drives in computers.  That ended up resulting in lawsuits against Sony, which caused Sony to immediately remove that copy protection, and settle those lawsuits which cost Sony a ton of money.

 

Something that I heard discussed a few years ago, and made a lot of sense, was that no one would try to copy a DVD movie, if that DVD movie was sold for a reasonable price.  Like I mentioned, any movie, by the time it gets released on DVD, has already made enough money to cover it's cost to make, and the DVD market is just added revenue for the movie producers.  If they sold DVD movies for $5 instead of $20, it wouldn't be worth it to copy a DVD movie, since it would be so inexpensive to buy.  Back when they offered movies on both videotape and DVD formats, it cost more for the DVD version than it did for the videotape version.  The process of making the videotape version cost 25¢, whereas the cost of making the DVD version was less than 5¢, yet the videotape version was $11 and the DVD version was $20....again, they were ripping us off.

 

The same thing applies to music CDs.  If they charged $5 for a music CD instead of $20, then most people would just buy the CD.  When they charge $20 for it, a lot of people will just go to Youtube to find the songs they want, then record the songs as they listen to them, thereby getting the music for free.  There are plenty of software programs available that will record what you hear on your computer, so it's easy to just record any music that you find on Youtube or any other internet source, then, when you have all of the songs that you wanted, to just burn them to a CD.  

 

Years ago, I purchased the full version of PhotoShop.  I installed it on my home computer, which meant that I had to input the activation code that came with Photoshop, in order to be able to use PhotoShop.  I wanted to be able to use PhotoShop on my laptop computer, but in order to do that, I had to uninstall it from my home computer..  The copyright laws state that you can install a software program on as many computers as you want, but it can only be installed on one computer at any given time, meaning that you have to uninstall it from the first computer so that you could install it on a second computer.  Okay, so I decided to install it on my home computer, activate it, then uninstall it so that I could install it on a laptop computer that I took to work.  When you install it on a computer, it "phones home" with the activation code to verify that it's a legitimate version of PhotoShop.  When you uninstall it, it doesn't "phone home" to indicate that it was uninstalled, so when you install it on a second computer, the activation code doesn't work, since the activation code was used to activate it for the first computer, so you need to call Adobe, who makes PhotoShop, and have them deactivate the code from the first computer.  I purposely did this every day...installing it my home computer, then uninstalling it and installing it on my laptop computer, then, when I got home from work, uninstalling it from my laptop and installing it on my home computer.  That meant that I had to call Adobe several times a day to get them to reactivate the code.  It wasn't long before Adobe allowed people to install PhotoShop on both your home computer and your laptop, since they were being bombarded all day with calls from people, doing what I was doing, to activate the program.  If they want to play games, then I'll play games...let's see who wins!☺️

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buddy7
5 hours ago, Hammer said:

OneEye, I don't know if you remember this, but years ago, Sony tried to place some type of copy protection on their music CDs so that they couldn't be copied.  The copy protection ended up damaging CD players and CD drives in computers.  That ended up resulting in lawsuits against Sony, which caused Sony to immediately remove that copy protection, and settle those lawsuits which cost Sony a ton of money.

 

Something that I heard discussed a few years ago, and made a lot of sense, was that no one would try to copy a DVD movie, if that DVD movie was sold for a reasonable price.  Like I mentioned, any movie, by the time it gets released on DVD, has already made enough money to cover it's cost to make, and the DVD market is just added revenue for the movie producers.  If they sold DVD movies for $5 instead of $20, it wouldn't be worth it to copy a DVD movie, since it would be so inexpensive to buy.  Back when they offered movies on both videotape and DVD formats, it cost more for the DVD version than it did for the videotape version.  The process of making the videotape version cost 25¢, whereas the cost of making the DVD version was less than 5¢, yet the videotape version was $11 and the DVD version was $20....again, they were ripping us off.

 

The same thing applies to music CDs.  If they charged $5 for a music CD instead of $20, then most people would just buy the CD.  When they charge $20 for it, a lot of people will just go to Youtube to find the songs they want, then record the songs as they listen to them, thereby getting the music for free.  There are plenty of software programs available that will record what you hear on your computer, so it's easy to just record any music that you find on Youtube or any other internet source, then, when you have all of the songs that you wanted, to just burn them to a CD.  

 

Years ago, I purchased the full version of PhotoShop.  I installed it on my home computer, which meant that I had to input the activation code that came with Photoshop, in order to be able to use PhotoShop.  I wanted to be able to use PhotoShop on my laptop computer, but in order to do that, I had to uninstall it from my home computer..  The copyright laws state that you can install a software program on as many computers as you want, but it can only be installed on one computer at any given time, meaning that you have to uninstall it from the first computer so that you could install it on a second computer.  Okay, so I decided to install it on my home computer, activate it, then uninstall it so that I could install it on a laptop computer that I took to work.  When you install it on a computer, it "phones home" with the activation code to verify that it's a legitimate version of PhotoShop.  When you uninstall it, it doesn't "phone home" to indicate that it was uninstalled, so when you install it on a second computer, the activation code doesn't work, since the activation code was used to activate it for the first computer, so you need to call Adobe, who makes PhotoShop, and have them deactivate the code from the first computer.  I purposely did this every day...installing it my home computer, then uninstalling it and installing it on my laptop computer, then, when I got home from work, uninstalling it from my laptop and installing it on my home computer.  That meant that I had to call Adobe several times a day to get them to reactivate the code.  It wasn't long before Adobe allowed people to install PhotoShop on both your home computer and your laptop, since they were being bombarded all day with calls from people, doing what I was doing, to activate the program.  If they want to play games, then I'll play games...let's see who wins!☺️

Yesterday I spoke of having 3 DVD players in my spare-rooms per TV sets, I’m sure most of you guys can recall, the days of the VHSs which was replaced by the current DVD. Those were the days, some people at the time with the right equipment use to illegally copy VHS to VHS and knock them out cheaply on the black market, and believe me I got caught a few times buying what I thought was a genuine copy, especially when I thought I was getting a cheap copy of a recent movie which just came out. (How stupid was I) But that’s how it was at the time, with the VHS scam.

 

Last night I was curious to watched an old video example on how legally to copy your old VHS to DVDs, once the end of the VHSs came to an end which got replaced by the DVD, all my 200 hundred copies of old VHSs, as they were no further use to me without buying new equipment I binned the lot. From what I saw last night on video, to copy VHS to DVD, the gear you had to buy, that’s if you want to do it legally, you had to buy a combination kit to copy VHS to DVD and sometimes it never came with the correct cables, and having got the correct cables, what a lot faffing about to get them in the right terminal/ports, and the new kit had what look like hundreds of terminals at the back of it. And having got them in the right order, using the remote control, from the TV set to the combination VHS then back and forth to both to VHS and DVD recorder, and once you got there, never forget to take the tab-code off the old VHS before beginning to start copying on to the DVD. And this was just a general explanation, could probably go on further. (What a palaver) for its worth, though it was better off going out and buying a brand new DVD at The extortionate prices at the time.

 

As I was told how to do this so many times illegally, it just didn’t worth the exercise or bother. One of the reasons I went out and purchased a complete music centre, which does most things I wanted it to do, i.e. all UK radio stations, on auto you can go from CDs to DVD and Blu-ray, the sales guy took me through how this new set can be used as a DVD recorder, this was either a load of crap, or he wanted to get another sale for the day, without trying all the fancy things he says it can do, overall I’m happy with my music centre.

 

As you hinted Hammer we are being a rip-off, with the global recorded music industry worth $19.1 billion in 2018, and rising, we are being taken for a huge financial ride. There’s a big enough market out there from the public, its time they stop ripping us off.

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Hammer

Buddy, I never had any interest in copying my VHS tapes to DVDs because once you did, you ended up with a DVD that would have had the same poor quality of the VHS movie.  I remember that to copy a VHS movie to another VHS tape, you needed special equipment, since the movie on VHS tape had copy protection on it.  My VCR/DVD recorders will copy a home made VHS tape (like a video of your kid's birthday, or of their ball game) to a DVD, which I have done many times for other people.  I just run the VHS video on fast forward from beginning to end to see how long the video is (all of my units will stop when the video is over).  Once I see how long the video is, if it's less than two hours long, which is the most that a single layer, blank DVD will hold, I just set the DVD recording to last a minute or two longer than the videotape.  Once that's done, I just push the button "VHS-DVD", and hit "Start" and the recorder will copy the VHS video to the DVD, and once it's finished copying, it will finalize the DVD, and it's ready to go.  Oh, and just to mention, all of my VCR/DVD recorders will record and play DVD-RAM disks.

 

If the VHS video is longer than two hours, I will set the Recorder on "Custom", input the time needed to make the copy, and the recorder will copy the video to the DVD at a speed that is slow enough for the entire video to be recorded on the DVD.

 

Something else that irks me about the recording industry...over the years when VHS movies were all that you could buy, I built up a library of over 650 movies at a cost of over $10,000.  I bought shelves for them, and arranged them in alphabetical order.  Then they phased out videotape and switched to DVDs, so my videotape collection is worthless.  If I were to switch to the DVDs which be a lot more expensive, then they will stop making them and switch to Blu-Ray DVDs.  They are also experimenting with the smaller DVDs (8cm) but they don't hold as much data as the full sized ones do...yet.  Heck, it won't be too much longer before they come out with 3-D optical disks and the drives for them.  A 3-D optical disk would be the same physical size as a DVD, but will hold a petabyte (1,000 terabytes or 1 million gigabytes) of storage.  That means that it would hold 125,000 movies...on a single disk.

Edited by Hammer

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OneEye

HDD (Hard Disc Drives) have moved on to SSD (Solid State Drives) This was inevitable. An average DVD movie is about 5GB. San Disk sells 400GB MicroSD cards for about $100. That's 80 movies on something that has zero moving parts and can fit in your wallet.

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