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Deborah M

New diagnosis Type II

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Deborah M

Hello,

I hope that someone can address my question. 

 

I was just diagnosed with diabetes, type II, about 6 weeks ago at age 65.
 
I am a retired R.N., so I have some knowledge of diabetes.  I, however, am confused about one thing.
 
I have read that the recommended daily intake of sugar should be less than 25 grams.  Does this include natural sugars that are found in fresh vegetables & fruits?  OR does this mean "added sugars" that I am reading about?  I am truly confused about these intake issues.
 
I am documenting & weighing my food religiously (Fat Secret).  I am able to see the grams of protein, fats, sugars, etc. for each food and a daily compilation of calories and nutrients.  The sugars are not subdivided into natural and added sugars, hence my confusion.
 
Your attention is greatly appreciated! 😁
Sincerely,
D Matney 

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meyery2k

Welcome! - Many here, including me, have found the best means to controlling blood sugar is to eat a minimal amount of carbohydrates in general.  Most of my carbs are from non root vegetables and nuts.

 

Other than berries, I don't eat too much fruit because it has too many carbs (at least for me).

 

A low carb high fat diet worked wonders for me.  I lost over 100 pounds.  I also became fit again but that is a tale for another post.

 

I would encourage you to check out the posts and you can see how many of us were new to this site and then progressed to where we are now.

 

Many of us here consume less than 50g of carbs a day.

 

What kind of diet were you following when you were diagnosed?  What are you numbers like?

 

You might also search "eat to your meter" as this can really unlock how you work and things you can and can't do to keep this in check. ~ Mike

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Kit

Hi @Deborah M, welcome to the group.

 

First, a slightly sarcastic response.  As an RN, forget everything you learned about treating diabetes.  It is, at best, inaccurate and very out of date.

 

Its not just sugar that affects blood glucose levels, but all carbohydrates in general.

Some people count what is called net carbs, which usually subtracts fiber content from the total carb count.  I have personally found through testing myself, that fiber does affect my numbers so I tend to count total carbs.

 

Above, Mike mentioned eating to your meter.  What this means is that you test your blood glucose levels before a meal and then two hours after the first bite.  This will let you know how your body is reacting to the foods you eat.  You can then make adjustments to your diet based upon those results.

 

According to the CDC, the risk of diabetic complications decreases to that of non diabetics with an A1C of under 6.0.  In general, you can hit that goal with the following.

 

Fasting and before meals:  under 100

1 hour after a meal - under 140

2 hours after a meal - under 120

 

Through this method, I have found the following.

 

Dietary fat has absolutely no affect on my BG numbers.

Protein has a very minimal affect on my numbers.  I've honestly never been able to eat enough in one serving to have much of a noticeable affect.  Its really hard to overeat on natural unprocessed protein.

Carbohydrates (all) have very real affects on my numbers, and so for that reason I try to keep my dietary intake of carbs to be as low as possible.

 

Through eating to my meter, I have found that I can tolerate about 30g of total carbs per day.  I seem to be most sensitive to them in the morning and less so later in the day.  So meals I eat early in the day contain very few carbs.  Meals later in the day will usually contain more.

 

Because my carb intake is so low, I choose to get my carbs from low carbohydrate vegetables.

 

Some examples:

Broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, asparagus, green beans, wax beans, cucumbers, zucchini, yellow squash, all greens (lettuces, spinach, kale, collard greens, mustard greens, etc), cabbages, celery, avocado, eggplant, mushrooms, olives and similar.

 

In more moderation there are tomatoes, snow peas, carrots, onions, peppers, turnips and radishes.

 

I avoid all grains (they do NOT play well), most root vegetables (except for the ones I listed in moderation above), and almost all fruit.

I do eat some berries (strawberries and blackberries are my personal favorites) but in small amounts and usually just when they are their best in season.

 

I also avoid milk (lactose is sugar) but do make use of dairy products such as cheeses, heavy cream, and sour cream.  I personally don't like yogurt, but many here have success with it as long as its not sweetened or flavored (lots of added sugar).  Plain greek yogurt is usually the one of choice.  If you like to drink milk, many lean towards but milks such as almond, coconut, or similar.

 

I also eat eggs, fish and meats, only avoiding types which I just don't personally like.

 

Nuts and some sees are also on the to eat list, though some can be higher carb than others.  Cashews can be significantly high so I avoid them.  Same with pistachios.  I have found that it can be very difficult to stick with portion control with nuts and seeds so I try to not keep them around in any quantity anymore.  They can trigger the desire to munch in me.

 

Beans sadly affect me more then I like, so I save those to small portions maybe a handful of times a year.

 

Depending on what your diet has been like up to this point, I recommend starting at about 100g of carbs a day.  This is an easier amount to adjust to and then you can make adjustments as your meter shows you what you can tolerate.

 

I recommend checking out our Dieting and Nutrition section, especially the Recipes sub section.  There are a lot of good ideas in there as well as links to recipe sites, and general.

 

Feel free to ask any questions you may have.  There's a lot of direct experience here and the only stupid question is the one left unasked.

 

I wish you the best of luck.  :)

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dowling gram

You've got good advice already so I'll just welcome! Stick around! The best way to control Diabetes and get good support will be found here

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adiantum

Welcome @Deborah M .

It will seem like a culture shock to read of  success stories here that contradict the advice given by the health dept but trust us..it works.

A BG meter will give you the basis of what foods you tolerate. It will also encourage you to keep exploring food choices & enjoy the feeling good experience.

 

Dont count sugars.. it's carbohydrates that we cant tolerate. 

 

Log on & post often, we are all here to support  you.

 

Edited by adiantum

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SteeVay

I was also diagnosed with diabetes Type 2 on December 30, 2019.  I was prescribed Metformin 500 mg, two tablets in the morning and two in the afternoon.  I was also prescribed Trulicity, but it is not possible for me to afford this medication.  I have a $3,000 deductible and my insurance only pays 40% after I meet the deductible.  I will get Medicare in November and I am hopeful I will be better able to afford Trulicity.  I was given four sample doses of Trulicity, but I haven't taken it because I know I will never be able to afford it long term.  Will I be able to manage my diabetes without this medication?  

 

I have reduced the Metformin to only one tablet in the morning and one in the afternoon.  I have started a low carb diet and plan to gradually increase the Metformin to 2000 mg a day, but starting at that dose has been too rough for my body.      

 

I have ordered a meter, lancets, and test strips and will begin testing when they arrive tomorrow.

 

I am changing doctors and have an appointment with a new doctor in two weeks.  Will I be okay taking only 1000 mg of Metformin for the next two weeks?  Should I go ahead and take the four doses of Trulicity, even though I will not be able to continue it? 

 

  

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Hammer
1 hour ago, SteeVay said:

I was also diagnosed with diabetes Type 2 on December 30, 2019.  I was prescribed Metformin 500 mg, two tablets in the morning and two in the afternoon.  I was also prescribed Trulicity, but it is not possible for me to afford this medication.  I have a $3,000 deductible and my insurance only pays 40% after I meet the deductible.  I will get Medicare in November and I am hopeful I will be better able to afford Trulicity.  I was given four sample doses of Trulicity, but I haven't taken it because I know I will never be able to afford it long term.  Will I be able to manage my diabetes without this medication?  

 

I have reduced the Metformin to only one tablet in the morning and one in the afternoon.  I have started a low carb diet and plan to gradually increase the Metformin to 2000 mg a day, but starting at that dose has been too rough for my body.      

 

I have ordered a meter, lancets, and test strips and will begin testing when they arrive tomorrow.

 

I am changing doctors and have an appointment with a new doctor in two weeks.  Will I be okay taking only 1000 mg of Metformin for the next two weeks?  Should I go ahead and take the four doses of Trulicity, even though I will not be able to continue it? 

 

  

Steevay, all I can do is to relate my experience with Byetta, which seems to do the same thing as Trulicity.  Drugs like this only do one thing....force your pancreas, which is already overworked since you are a type 2 diabetic, to overwork even more, which will eventually burn out your pancreas.  Once that happens, then you will be forced to go on insulin.  ANY medication that forces your pancreas to work even harder, will eventually burn out your pancreas.  As a type 2 diabetic, you are insulin resistant, which is the definition of type 2 diabetes.  Being insulin resistant, that means that, while your pancreas releases insulin to compensate for the glucose that is released into your bloodstream, your blood cells resist using that insulin, so your pancreas releases even more insulin.  Doing this over time, is overworking your pancreas, which is not a good thing, since it will eventually burn out your pancreas.

 

The only oral medication that doesn't force your pancreas to produce more insulin is metformin.  My digestive system couldn't handle metformin, but if yours can, I'd stick with that.  If it was my body, I wouldn't use Trulicity or any other drug the forces my body to produce more insulin, but that's just me, you have to decide for yourself.

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Kit
1 hour ago, SteeVay said:

I was also diagnosed with diabetes Type 2 on December 30, 2019.  I was prescribed Metformin 500 mg, two tablets in the morning and two in the afternoon.  I was also prescribed Trulicity, but it is not possible for me to afford this medication.  I have a $3,000 deductible and my insurance only pays 40% after I meet the deductible.  I will get Medicare in November and I am hopeful I will be better able to afford Trulicity.  I was given four sample doses of Trulicity, but I haven't taken it because I know I will never be able to afford it long term.  Will I be able to manage my diabetes without this medication?  

 

I have reduced the Metformin to only one tablet in the morning and one in the afternoon.  I have started a low carb diet and plan to gradually increase the Metformin to 2000 mg a day, but starting at that dose has been too rough for my body.      

 

I have ordered a meter, lancets, and test strips and will begin testing when they arrive tomorrow.

 

I am changing doctors and have an appointment with a new doctor in two weeks.  Will I be okay taking only 1000 mg of Metformin for the next two weeks?  Should I go ahead and take the four doses of Trulicity, even though I will not be able to continue it? 

 

  

 

hI @SteeVay, welcome to the group.

 

It is very normal to slowly increase your Metformin dose due to gastric issues.  I'm surprised your doctor didn't mention this when giving you the prescription.

 

In all honesty, going low carb is going to have a greater affect on your numbers than metformin, at least early on.  Metformin takes time to build up in your system and get to full effectiveness.  It also does not actively lower your blood glucose levels.  Instead it helps by working in your liver to help lower insulin resistance and reduce the amount of stored glucose your liver releases into your system.

 

I don't think it will hurt to delay on the trulicity for the 2 weeks until your new doctor appointment.  He/she should be able to find an alternative  that shouldn't break the bank for you.

 

Depending on how well your body responds to the low carb diet, you may actually find that you don't need anything more than metformin.  I was diagnosed with an A1C of 10.4 and my doctor was talking about putting me on the full dose of metformin and adding insulin.  Six months later I had an A1C of 5.2 and had never gone beyond 500mg metformin twice a day.

 

I wish you luck.  Feel free to ask any questions you might have.  There are a lot of good resources here and a lot of first hand experience.

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meyery2k

@SteeVay - Welcome!  With diet and exercise, I have been able to not need any medicine.  It took some time and discipline.  Low carb high fat diet and moderate exercise had the greatest effects.

 

Check out the recipes.  Check out the site and you will see many cases where things looked grim and then they turned out not so bad. ~ Mike

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SteeVay

Thank you everyone.  I am ready to battle the beast!  I am thankful for finding this forum.

 

Edited by SteeVay

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meyery2k

@SteeVay-What are your numbers like?  What is your A1c?  If you care to share with us your diet we might be able to help with suggestions to make this easier and, possibly, work better.

 

I was given the best advice on this forum.  When I was diagnosed, the doctor gave me a bottle of Metformin and explained that eventually I would need insulin because diabetes is progressive.  It has now been 4 years.  It took about 3 months to get my fasting BG and A1c to a non-diabetic level and in 6 months, the doctor was suggesting to stop the Metformin.  He was extremely skeptical of the diet I am on but is no longer after seeing results.

 

As I got to know him better, he admitted that diabetes diagnoses are difficult for him because most patients don't even try to follow his advice.

 

I am no doctor and only back this with the experience I have had with diabetes.  If I were in your situation, I wouldn't fret too much about the Trulicity.  I would see what diet, exercise, and Metformin do.  Eating less carbs, at least for some, seems to offset some of the gastric side effects of the Metformin.  I don't like the idea of making something work to produce.  Like @Hammer said, that wears things out.

 

If you really want to see some off the wall ideas, there are some researchers coming around to thinking that many diabetes patients actually suffer from long term hyperinsulinemia (too much insulin).  If this turns out to be true, then Trulicity might not be such a good thing.

 

Again, welcome, and we look forward to having you as a member. ~ Mike

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meyery2k

To the recent new members that posted...

 

I just realized my 4th diabetes anniversary recently came and passed.  I was a mess when I was first diagnosed.  A1c was 8.5 and fasting readings in the 300's.  I had no idea what diabetes even was.  I thought that I just had to avoid sugar.  I learned that it was carbohydrates in general that would elevate glucose.  It took some time and research on my part but I found this site and it helped me.  My PCP initially prescribe Metformin, suggested that I change my diet, and exercise.  He explained that diabetes usually progressed and that I might eventually need to start using insulin.  I have seen relatives and friends lose limbs, eyesight, kidneys, and life to diabetes.  This was a very grim day indeed.  I was a mess in other ways too.  I weighed 315 pounds, my BP was something like 180/110, sitting in a chair my pulse was 120, and I would be winded just walking up a flight of stairs.

 

Diabetes was, and still is, the motivation to try and take better care of myself.  I started walking with a goal of 10,000 steps a day minimum.

 

I found this site and while I was a bit stubborn to accept the dietary changes, I eventually adopted a low carb/high fat model because I could eat things that I liked and would stay satiated.  I concentrated on dieting primarily to control my fasting glucose with a secondary goal of 1500-1800 calories a day to lose weight.

 

In 3 months time, my fasting readings were consistently under 100, I lost enough weight to where I needed to buy new clothes, my BP and pulse rates were much improved.  I continued on.

 

Within 1 year, I had lost 100 pounds, I could run.  I re-discovered I hated running and got into cycling.  My BP was good.  My resting heart rate was down in the 50's.  My cholesterol was excellent.  My PCP was astounded.  At first, he thought I was using meth because the weight was coming down so fast.  I had to provide him with a food log to prove I was being healthy.  He then said to keep doing what I am doing since it looked like it was working.  My A1c was in the 4's and there was discussion to drop the Metformin.

 

By year 2 I proved I could maintain my weight.  I completed a statue century (100 mile) ride.  I kept up all the accomplishments I made in year 1.  No backsliding.

 

This year, year 4, I cycle harder than ever.  My weight is up to 225 but I don't fret about it.  I feel great.  I think I turned the clock back a few years.  I write this to encourage you that it can be done.  Everyone's path is different but some small changes can lead to dramatic differences.

 

Here's a "then and now"...

 

Image may contain: 1 person, sitting and indoor

 

Image may contain: Michael Meyer, bicycle, tree, outdoor and nature  

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