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anon125

Type 2 does nightly insulin affect A1C

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anon125

The A1c is usually around 6.2, last was an amazing 5.7.

My morning numbers were dropping to 3s and 4s so I gradually reduced the nightly insulin from 17 units to 12.

Todays A1C number was 6.5. high for me.

 With Type 2 does nightly insulin affect A1C?

Of course one has to remember that A1C lab results can vary by 15%  so a 6 reading could produce a number of 6.9.

Medical folks here have no idea. Nurse I just spoke to was looking up what insulin does!

Old and not overweight thanks to Jennys books

Thanks all

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Kit

Wait a minute.  A nurse had to look up what insulin does?  The very statement makes me sick.  And they are treating diabetic patients???

 

Yes, anything that affects your BG numbers either up or down will have an affect on your A1C, since its basically an average of your BG numbers over the course of about 3 months.  So the insulin dropped your morning numbers (100% expected) and thus you will see a lowering in your A1C.  Reducing your insulin, and thus having higher BG numbers, will raise your A1C.

 

I see nothing wrong with morning numbers in the 4s.  3s is getting a bit too low however so I can understand dropping your insulin dose a little.  If you are not happy with your higher A1C, its not your morning numbers you need to worry about, but your numbers the rest of the day, especially after meals.

 

What do those numbers look like?

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adiantum

Theyre not really OK anon as they shouldnt be over 7, so theres something in your food choices that dont agree with you.

 

 

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meyery2k

Since there can be so many reasons to be diabetic, eating to your meter provides a great deal of insight.  What works great for me, might not work for you since we can have profoundly different reasons for presenting with T2.

 

In my case, my discovery is that I am insulin resistant.  If I exercise and I limit my intake of carbs, staying away from simple carbs like starches and sugars, then I present as a normal person.  My A1c's are in normal range and my fasting reading is less than 100.  While I can't get diabetes off the chart (it doesn't work like that) my PCP has commented that I have a very mild case (lol) and that it is in remission.

 

To explain, if you are not already...

 

Take a reading before a meal.  Note it down.  Eat.  Take a reading about 2 hours after eating.  Your goal is to have a reading near where you started.  If it is staying consistently higher, then a closer look at diet might be in order.  This is where logging you meals and counting carbs can help.  If the price of strips are an issue get a Relion meter from Walmart.  100 strips costs about $20.  When you get a good feel for the diet you won't have to test so much.  I perform a random test just to make sure I am doing OK in the day.  Insurance covers 1 test a day which is my fasting.  One other fact that is good to know is that fasting readings are the last to show trends whether good or bad.

 

We can help as well.  Even people that have to use insulin will agree that limiting carbs leads to better results in not needing so much insulin and not having to worry as much about hypoglycemia.

 

We are here because we have diabetes and we want to help people that need it.  There is, sadly, a great deal of misinformation out there which you can see if you go through some of the posts here.

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anon125

some forums do not let you name the books - they think it is advertising.

blood sugar 101

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OneEye

If I did exactly the same thing every day for 90 days, ate the same thing, walked the same distance, I would expect my A1c to show me how my diet and exercise were affecting me. Thing is...all an A1c does is show your glycated hemoglobin for the last three months. It's like a cop pulling you over and then looking at your odometer to see how fast you were going last Friday night.

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Hammer

Okay, first, nightly insulin, in my case Lantus (you might be taking Levemir), lowers your fasting glucose levels....it has no effect on your after meal spikes.  Your A1c is based on both your fasting glucose levels AND your after meal spikes.  I use both a nightly insulin (Lantus), and a before meal insulin (Novolog), and what I try to do is to keep my fasting glucose levels, which is controlled by my Lantus, into the 70's, in your case, since your meter reads mmol/L instead of the mg/dl that my meter reads, that would translate into the 3.9 range, which is good.

 

When I am about to eat some food, I look up the carb content of that food, and take the appropriate amount of Novolog to adjust for the carbs in that food.  My goal in taking the Novolog insulin is to keep my after meal spikes from exceeding 140, although 120 would be better.

 

Keep in mind that your A1C is just an average of your glucose levels over a three month period.  That means that if your glucose levels spike to say, 200, but only stay at 200 for an hour, then drop back down to a more normal level, then your A1C won't be affected that much by that.  If your glucose levels spike to 200, but stay there for 3 or 4 hours, then that will have a more pronounced effect on your A1C.

 

Since your A1C is an average of your glucose levels over a three month period, your A1C might not be a true indicator of how good or bad your glucose levels have been for you.  Your after meal spikes could be 200 most of the time, but your fasting glucose levels could be 60 most of the time.  The thing is, how long were your glucose levels at 200, and how long were they at 60?  If they were at 60 a lot longer than they were at 200, then your A1C would indicate that your A1C was in the "normal" range.  If your glucose levels were in the 200 range longer than they were in the 60 range, then your A1C would indicate that your A1C was too high.

 

The objective with diabetes, is to do everything you can to keep your BG levels as close to normal levels as possible.  By doing that, you can avoid, or at least hold off, diabetic complications for as long as possible.

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