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buddy7

Supermarkets-Self-checkouts!

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Dowling
15 hours ago, Hammer said:

As for enlarging a picture and not losing sharpness, Photoshop doesn't do a good job of it.  I have two other programs that do it better than Photoshop, one is ON1 Resize, which I've used with so-so results, and I recently bought Topaz Labs Gigapixel Ai, which uses artificial intelligence to resize pictures, and it works really well.  Here is a link to their website, and if you scroll down the page, they have some photos where you can move your cursor from left to right, and it shows you the before and after look of each picture.   This is the best software I have ever seen for enlarging photos without losing sharpness.  It's only downside is that you can only enlarge a photo up to 600%.

Edited 15 hours ago by Hammer

Thanks Hammer I just may get that software. I've saved that link. I do like to enlarge photos for my oil paintings to get the details and this would give me a clearer picture. I refer to my photo all the time while I'm painting. How is it at giving you true color or is that something I have to control while printing like I do now. I also grayscale photos to get the contrast for paintings and print them on regular paper.

 

You got into computers long before me. My first computer was an XP. I'm glad I learned on that. It was by far the best computer for a newbie. If I had waited for Vista I would have been screwed. My neighbour showed me how to do photos using Microsoft's office/word but a lot I learned on my own by exploring.

 

I can see why you buy in bulk, If I used that much paper I'd do it too.

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Diana_CT
17 hours ago, Hammer said:

As for enlarging a picture and not losing sharpness, Photoshop doesn't do a good job of it.  I have two other programs that do it better than Photoshop, one is ON1 Resize, which I've used with so-so results, and I recently bought Topaz Labs Gigapixel Ai, which uses artificial intelligence to resize pictures, and it works really well.  Here is a link to their website, and if you scroll down the page, they have some photos where you can move your cursor from left to right, and it shows you the before and after look of each picture.   This is the best software I have ever seen for enlarging photos without losing sharpness.  It's only downside is that you can only enlarge a photo up to 600%.

I use Topaz DeNoise AI and I like it...

DSC_4739_40_41_Painterly-3-denoise.JPG

This is a HDR photo that I made from using Photomatrix to merge the photos and Topaz DeNoise AI

In Photomatrix I used a preset call Painterly/

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Hammer

Dowling, Gigapixel Ai just resizes the picture, it doesn't affect the colors of the picture.  Whatever you do now before printing a picture, you will still have to do.

 

Diana, when I bought Gigapixel Ai, I bought a bundle of their software.  They offer different bundles, so I opted for their DeNoise Ai, their Sharpen Ai, their Gigapixel Ai, and their JPEG to Raw Ai.  I haven't played around much with the other three programs, but they all use artificial intelligence, which they seem to have perfected for these programs. 

I am always interested in photo editing and manipulation software, and I used to have Photomatrix, but I must have left it on my previous computer.  I bought it for it's HDR capabilities, but being the lousy photographer that I am, I rarely used the program. 

If anyone is using Photoshop, there is one program that I highly recommend...Curvemeister.  It's a plug-in for Photoshop and Photoshop Elements, and it's like Photoshop's curves tool on steroids.  It took me a while before I understood how to use it, but I was taking the course offered on the Curvemeister website, and with the very patient help of the instructor, I finally figured out how to use it.  If anyone should decide to get Curvemeister, enroll in their course, it's well worth the money.

Edited by Hammer

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Diana_CT

@Hammer

I have Photoshop CS5 that I bought when I was graduating from grad school in 2011 for the amazing sum of $168! Student discount, kind of wants to make me go back to college for that ".edu" email account. I don't want to use the cloud so I haven't updated Photoshop or Lightroom 6, I backup my photos on an external USB 850G drive and on to a 1T network drive

 

Did you see the "Ops..." Adobe did to Lightroom? They deleted everyone's photos and presets on the cloud by mistake on the latest update and their response was "Sorry about that." One person had over 800 photos deleted!

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Hammer

Diana, that is why I NEVER upload anything to "The Cloud".  As for Photoshop, I have versions 3.0, 5.0, 7.0, CS3 and CS6.  After CS6, Adobe thought that they'd make more money going to a cloud based Photoshop.  I think that was a bad decision, because a lot of their money came from people like me who wanted to buy Photoshop, not pay a monthly subscription price for it.  Why pay $10 a month ($120 a year) for a program that you might use just 5 or 6 times a year?  Upgrades to Photoshop cost about $150 a year, so who in their right mind would want to pay $120 a year for a cloud based version of it, when you could just buy it outright for $150 for an upgrade that would last you forever?

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buddy7

I often mention my local supermarket approximately 5-6 minutes’ drive from my home located near Lakeside shopping compound there has an abundance of departments in-store which they cater for about everything in its store, apart from all the foods and vegetables one buys to feed their families, they also have a bakery, pharmacist, stationary, deli for cold cooked meats and fish, wine and liqueur aisles, there have they own brand men and ladies fashion, plus 4 other clothing franchises within the store, Home and Entertainment, household products, a vitamins counter, a Photoshop, travel Money kiosk, their own Bank, a fuel garage, on its compound, cashier till service or self-checkout service, lottery counter, tobacco and cigarettes counter, they also do a grocery delivery home service, grocery point cashback card plus gas vouchers, these are just some of the services my supermarket provides.

 

Just going back a bit to self-checkouts, how long will it be in the UK before supermarkets with cashier tills, will this be the death knell for 200,000 cashier jobs? On my research, read somewhere one of the leading high street supermarkets in the UK and the US already have all self-checkouts lanes at one of their main street stores.

1868584743_aview2.jpg.3107d12fc96cc45c59add73ae50af2c7.jpgTesco Extra, cygnet view, lakeside, West Thurrock, Grays

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Hammer

Buddy, that store sounds like one of our Wal-Marts, only Wal-Marts also sell guns and ammo.😊

 

If stores all go to only self checkouts, I think they will have problems.  Lots of people don't like self checkouts, so those people will shop elsewhere.  Also, lots of people, myself included, enjoy talking to the cashiers as we are placing our items on the conveyor belt.  Then you have technically challenged people who can't understand how to use a self checkout machine.  I have seen this happen numerous times, where the self checkout overseer, who watches everyone, and helps someone when they have a problem, was trying to explain to someone on how to use the self checkout machine.  Right now, all of those self checkout machines only accept credit cards, they no longer accept cash, so people who need to use cash HAVE to go to a cashier checkout counter.  I think they went to credit cards only, due to the Covid-19....they don't want people handling money, as there is no way to sanitize money.

Edited by Hammer

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buddy7

Hammer, 

That’s interesting to know Walmart’s sells guns and ammo, just a need to know a question, is the gun sales, happens to be an outside franchise who have a store within Walmart?

 

“Lots of people don't like self-checkouts”, and I have to agree with you, when I go into my local supermarket you never see the lines (queues) formed at the self-checkout machines, and to my knowledge, yes, people who use self-checkouts machines are those who have the expertise to do so. You’re not going to see an aged person with no knowledge using these machines, as much as they are an attendant there to show them how to (no disrespect) from my experience age people for some reason always shy away from any new technology. And that’s why you’ll see more age people, in the line (queuing-up) at the cashier tills. Yes, and you’re quite right, I happen to use the self-checkouts this morning, and the first thing the attendant said to me, all self-checkouts machines are card-payment only, they may have had a notice up but I didn’t see it. “They don't want people handling money, as there is no way to sanitize money”. I never can understand that hypothesis, and how do the Banks and others like supermarkets and other vendors get on? As like yourself, I do like to have a chat with cashier till clerks at my local supermarket, but the way it’s going, more and more stores are going totally self-checkouts. Would you say, give it the next 5 years before other stores follow suit?

 

A point to make, my local supermarket has some 20 of these self-checkout machines and about 5-6 cashier tills, looks like the way forward, probably the UK will see all self-checkouts soon, which begs the question, cashier job losses.

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Hammer

Buddy, Wal-Mart has a department for guns, just like they do for clothing, electronics, auto, etc.  It's not a separate franchise, it's just another department in Wal-Mart.  I used to go there to buy my 9mm and .40 caliber ammo, but now, I find that it's cheaper to buy it online, and have it shipped (for free) to my house.  The free shipping comes in handy because , when you're buying 500 to 1000 rounds of ammo, it does weight a lot, so shipping would be costly.

 

Another bonus with Wal-Mart...if you order something from them online, they only charge you $1 to ship it to you, regardless of how much it weighs.

 

I agree that it makes no sense that the stores make you use credit cards at the machines, because they don't want people handling money.  As you walk in and out of Wal-Mart, they have hand sanitizer at the entrances, so as you leave the store, just use the hand sanitizer if you've handled money.

 

Heck, if they are that concerned about handling money, then what about the postal worker who delivers your mail?  That person handles hundreds of letters every day....letters that hundreds of people have touched.  While it's possible that the postal worker might be wearing gloves, the people receiving the mail aren't, so while gloves may protect the postal worker, those gloves are coming in to contact with any bacteria that's on the letters, and that bacteria is now being spread on every piece of mail that he/she delivers.  I guess the obvious thing to do would be to open the mail, take the mail out of the envelope, then wash your hands before reading the mail, but how many are going to do that?

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Dowling

No one knows how long Covid lives on surfaces or what surfaces they live on longer than others but common sense tells me that you have less chance getting it from an inanimate object like money than from a person.

Just think of all the surfaces you touch going in and out of a store and while you are in the store. Even using a credit card would pose a problem. How do you know that the person using that machine before you was free from the virus. Do you wash your credit cards?

 

Hammer I don't think sanitizing money has any thing to do with why a credit card is required at self checkouts. If you used money someone would have to load that machine with not only bills but change and each denomination would have to have a separate compartment in order to give you the right change. A lot of calculations for a machine to make.  A credit transaction is just a matter of one swift action the same as swiping your card at a cashiers checkout.

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buddy7

Doing my shopping yesterday at my local supermarket, as I walked down the aisles noted the complete store was under refurbishment for the Christmas period. As a shopper noted nothing could be found in the regular places or shelves which I found annoying, and they had a staff member patrolling the aisles with a sign (ask me where things are), as we are currently under refurbishment.

 

As a business and monetary advantage, my patter to this cunning ploy, once the refurbishing is over, Christmas will be upon us, and it would be like walking into a new store, at a glance no one will know where nothing is on the shelves, to their advantage once they’re in the store keep them there asking store-staff where everything is, and while they’re doing so, they’ll be spending money unnecessarily. Especially around the Christmas period.

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Hammer

Buddy, the local Wal-Mart here does that from time to time.  They say that they are rearranging things to make the shelves more efficient...less wasted space.  I find it irritating, because I just want to get in, grab my stuff, and get out.  I hate shopping, as I feel it's a waste of time.  I used to like to go into Wal-Mart at 2 o'clock in the morning to do my grocery shopping.  I could go in, grab my groceries, and be checked out in less than 10 minutes.  When they move everything around, you can't find anything.  If I needed to buy batteries, I would walk into Wal-Mart, and just as I passed the checkout counters, they had displays of various batteries.  I'd just grab the ones I needed, and throw them in the shopping cart.  Now, they moved the battery displays to the back of the store, so I have to walk all the way back to the electronics section of the store to buy batteries.  What did they put in the spot where they originally had the battery displays? Nothing!...so why move the displays?  Did they think that placing the battery displays next to the big screen TVs, the music CDs and movie DVDs, was a good idea?🙄

 

I know that I will eventually learn where everything has been moved to, but like they always do, they will again move everything around so that I'll have to again, look for it.

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Dowling

That is annoying. Another thing that's annoying is where they place certain items.  My sister and her husband were coming for dinner one day and I wanted to make to make a special dessert--Apple betty pie. It calls for graham cracker crumbs. Graham crackers are a sort of thin cookie usually used in baking, I searched the baking aisle--none. I searched the cookie aisle--none. I finally found them lumped in with bread crumbs, shake-n-bake and croutons but to do that I had to search almost the whole store. There was no clerk around to ask and that wasn't the first time I had to scour a store for an item.

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don1942

I was recently in a Walmart and couldn’t find horse radish. I asked two young workers and neither knew what horse radish was.

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Hammer

I was in a local grocery store chain store, and asked a clerk where the canned chicken was.  We were standing in the aisle where they had cans of tuna fish, which is where the canned chicken usually is.  The clerk looked surprised and said that she had never heard of canned chicken.  Another shopper overheard us, and pointed out where the canned chicken was, which was further down the aisle, and located on the top shelf, whereas the tuna was located on the bottom shelf.  The two are usually located side by side.  I use the canned chicken to make chicken salad, or to sometimes add to noodle soup to make chicken noodle soup.

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buddy7
23 hours ago, Hammer said:

.I know that I will eventually learn where everything has been moved to, but like they always do, they will again move everything around so that I'll have to again, look for it.

Yes, Hammer, that’s the whole concept why these supermarkets do this to their customers, (move things around) while we’re looking for what we come in for in the first place, there’s always a good chance you’d buy something you didn’t come in for. Are we (stereotype), well the supermarket managers think we are?😉

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buddy7
18 hours ago, TX_Clint said:

If I can hand carry my purchase I use the machine. If I will need a cart I use a cashier.

Clint, the way technology is going, it won’t be long before they are all self-serve checkouts machines. Now that’s a shame, just think of the job losses. It’s happening in the UK as we speak.

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buddy7
22 hours ago, Dowling said:

That is annoying. Another thing that's annoying is where they place certain items.  My sister and her husband were coming for dinner one day and I wanted to make to make a special dessert--Apple betty pie. It calls for graham cracker crumbs. Graham crackers are a sort of thin cookie usually used in baking, I searched the baking aisle--none. I searched the cookie aisle--none. I finally found them lumped in with bread crumbs, shake-n-bake and croutons but to do that I had to search almost the whole store. There was no clerk around to ask and that wasn't the first time I had to scour a store for an item.

Dowling, this also really get on my nerves, all I want to do, is to come in get my shopping and get out, not to do a walking marathon through the aisles.😀

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buddy7
16 hours ago, don1942 said:

I was recently in a Walmart and couldn’t find horse radish. I asked two young workers and neither knew what horse radish was.

The problem here Don! Those two young workers, are probably on pea-nut money, so they’re not paid to think like management status. So they probably don’t give a toss. We get them in UK supermarkets as well, but you know that.

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Dowling
36 minutes ago, buddy7 said:

The problem here Don! Those two young workers, are probably on pea-nut money, so they’re not paid to think like management status. So they probably don’t give a toss. We get them in UK supermarkets as well, but you know that.

I don't think it was that they don't care. Although there are young people who just have a job for the money lots of them do a good job. There are lazy people in every generation. I remember my husband complaining about the pepsi generation--as he called them-- being lazy.

 

It is more likely that they had never heard of horse radish. They don't serve it at fast food places. Besides horse radish is an acquired taste and not common in most households.

 

What does bother me about the younger people is that they can't add or subtract. They are so used to calculators they can't make change for a $19.35 bill if you hand them $20 and coins . That shouldn't be blamed on them though but the ones who decide what to teach in schools and their parents

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buddy7
40 minutes ago, Dowling said:

I don't think it was that they don't care. Although there are young people who just have a job for the money lots of them do a good job. There are lazy people in every generation. I remember my husband complaining about the pepsi generation--as he called them-- being lazy.

 

It is more likely that they had never heard of horse radish. They don't serve it at fast food places. Besides horse radish is an acquired taste and not common in most households.

 

What does bother me about the younger people is that they can't add or subtract. They are so used to calculators they can't make change for a $19.35 bill if you hand them $20 and coins . That shouldn't be blamed on them though but the ones who decide what to teach in schools and their parents

Point taken Dowling about the younger generation, we no longer can mould them like our fore-parents’ generation, truth told, they are some very good young people who want to get on in life.

 

The hypothesis of the horseradish and you’re so right, it does have an acquired taste, often buy a couple of jars at a time, from my supermarket, keep one going in the fridge, and the other jar in the kitchen cupboard. Am I a fan, yes?

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Hammer
7 hours ago, Dowling said:

I don't think it was that they don't care. Although there are young people who just have a job for the money lots of them do a good job. There are lazy people in every generation. I remember my husband complaining about the pepsi generation--as he called them-- being lazy.

 

It is more likely that they had never heard of horse radish. They don't serve it at fast food places. Besides horse radish is an acquired taste and not common in most households.

 

What does bother me about the younger people is that they can't add or subtract. They are so used to calculators they can't make change for a $19.35 bill if you hand them $20 and coins . That shouldn't be blamed on them though but the ones who decide what to teach in schools and their parents

 

Dowling, what you mentioned was something that worried me...that the younger people can't add or subtract.  I have always prided myself on my ability to do that...to add and subtract, as well as multiply and divide numbers in my head, and get the correct answer.  I would go grocery shopping with my wife, and as she would place an item into the shopping cart, I'd add it up in my head, so that when we got to the checkout line, I would see if the total that I had in my head, matched the total that the cashier came up with....it usually did.  I did addition, subtraction, multiplication and division in my head for fun.  I can easily multiply two, two digit numbers in my head, and get the answer, and a lot of the time, I can multiply a two digit and a three digit number in my head and get the correct answer.  It's really easy for me, so when I see a younger person who can't even add correctly, I get concerned about whether our society will survive.  When I buy something that costs $8.25, and I give the cashier a ten dollar bill and a 25¢ quarter, and they have no idea what to give me back, worries me.  You'd think that they could see that I gave them $10.25 for an $8.25 item, and that I should get back $2, but to them, it's above their level of comprehension.  How are these young people going to make it through life if they can't do simple arithmetic? 

 

I do admit that my way of multiplying is most likely different than how most people multiply in their heads.  It's a way that I came up with to make things like this easier.  For example, many years ago when I was still married, my wife loved Bright Side shampoo, but it became difficult to find.  Apparently they stopped making it.  On my way home from work one day, I stopped into a convenience store, and I saw that they had 12 bottles of Bright Side shampoo on their shelf, so I grabbed all 12 bottles of it.  They cost $1.19 per bottle.  When I got to the checkout counter, the young clerk went to checkout the 12 bottles, so I quickly multiplied them in my head, and came up with $14.28.  I told the clerk this, and she asked me if I had a calculator, and I said no, I just calculated it in my head.  She dismissed that, and calculated on her calculator and came up with the same total.  This is how I multiply in my head...there were 12 bottles, each costing $1.19.  Okay, so if I add 1 cent to each bottle, that makes them cost $1.20.  Twelve bottles at $1.20, or 12 times 12 equals 144, or 12 times $1.20 equals $14.40, but I added 1 cent to each bottle, so I needed to subtract that 1 cent for each bottle, or 12 cents for 12 bottles from the total.  $14.40 minus 12 cents equals $14.28.  Trying to multiply 12 times $1.19 is too long, but by changing the $1.19 to $1.20, makes it a lot easier.  I don't know if this makes sense to others, but that's how I do it.

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Dowling
2 hours ago, Hammer said:

 

Dowling, what you mentioned was something that worried me...that the younger people can't add or subtract.  I have always prided myself on my ability to do that...to add and subtract, as well as multiply and divide numbers in my head, and get the correct answer.  I would go grocery shopping with my wife, and as she would place an item into the shopping cart, I'd add it up in my head, so that when we got to the checkout line, I would see if the total that I had in my head, matched the total that the cashier came up with....it usually did.  I did addition, subtraction, multiplication and division in my head for fun.  I can easily multiply two, two digit numbers in my head, and get the answer, and a lot of the time, I can multiply a two digit and a three digit number in my head and get the correct answer.  It's really easy for me, so when I see a younger person who can't even add correctly, I get concerned about whether our society will survive.  When I buy something that costs $8.25, and I give the cashier a ten dollar bill and a 25¢ quarter, and they have no idea what to give me back, worries me.  You'd think that they could see that I gave them $10.25 for an $8.25 item, and that I should get back $2, but to them, it's above their level of comprehension.  How are these young people going to make it through life if they can't do simple arithmetic? 

 

I do admit that my way of multiplying is most likely different than how most people multiply in their heads.  It's a way that I came up with to make things like this easier.  For example, many years ago when I was still married, my wife loved Bright Side shampoo, but it became difficult to find.  Apparently they stopped making it.  On my way home from work one day, I stopped into a convenience store, and I saw that they had 12 bottles of Bright Side shampoo on their shelf, so I grabbed all 12 bottles of it.  They cost $1.19 per bottle.  When I got to the checkout counter, the young clerk went to checkout the 12 bottles, so I quickly multiplied them in my head, and came up with $14.28.  I told the clerk this, and she asked me if I had a calculator, and I said no, I just calculated it in my head.  She dismissed that, and calculated on her calculator and came up with the same total.  This is how I multiply in my head...there were 12 bottles, each costing $1.19.  Okay, so if I add 1 cent to each bottle, that makes them cost $1.20.  Twelve bottles at $1.20, or 12 times 12 equals 144, or 12 times $1.20 equals $14.40, but I added 1 cent to each bottle, so I needed to subtract that 1 cent for each bottle, or 12 cents for 12 bottles from the total.  $14.40 minus 12 cents equals $14.28.  Trying to multiply 12 times $1.19 is too long, but by changing the $1.19 to $1.20, makes it a lot easier.  I don't know if this makes sense to others, but that's how I do it.

Precisely my point Hammer. Kids are not taught their times tables any more and they are not taught to add and subtract in their heads either. I do the same thing when shopping not just for groceries but other things too. The difference is I round things up or down since only looking for an estimate not an exact figure. Much like you did with the shampoo. I'm always within a dollar or 2 of the total. I do it to keep from getting a surprise at the cash but it also keeps your mind sharp.

 

A Last year I took an Alzheimer's test which I passed with a perfect score. One of the questions was to subtract by 7's back from 100 in your head. I surprised the nurse giving the test by using the rule of 10. I started 93 then said 4 from 90 is 86, 1 from 80 is 79, 72, 5 from 70 is 65. At this point she stopped me and said she had never heard anyone do it that way. I said have you never heard of the rule of 10. I can't remember the grade but I know I was taught that in school. I also said they had better change this test when teens get old because they'd never be able to do it. In fact I'll bet they couldn't do it now

Edited by Dowling

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buddy7

Hammer and Dowling can’t agree with you more, living in western society by law the child/children start proper school at 5 years of age, in some countries after 11 years at school, the child then has the chance to go to 6 form college by then the parents decide rather you should go to University given the qualifications at pre-schooling, what completely riles me up, with all that education he/she been given, they still can’t work out simple arithmetic or mathematical equations in their heads without using a calculator. OK! Let’s start at home, my 4 girls all had 6 form college education, which runs from 16 to eighteen years of age, and what I found so annoying, kitting them out for college Mum and I dare not leave the calculator off the list of what they would need in their studies at college. And if I happen to ask them to query the shopping list, the first they do is to grab for the calculator, nothing is worked out in their heads. Now isn’t that a shame?

 

 

Yes in my day I also had a 6 form college education, but it never lasted for 2 years, can recall my first job working for a building contractor, on-site had many jobs, carpentry, brick-laying, plumbing and electrical work, a man of many trades but master of none. So this was going nowhere, so I enrolled out of my area with a Technical college for a course engineering 50% practical and 50% theory. My engineering course consist of centre-lathe turning, capstan lathe turning and maintenance engineering, all working from a draftsman-drawings, so I had to be well-schooled in arithmetic and mathematic. You see I always wanted to be a general practitioner but owing to the general worker's trade union strikes across the UK 84-85 constantly meant job changes for many manual workers.

 

 

Hammer and Dowling gave some basic examples of doing calculations in your head, as like the shopping this is something I’ve done for years, as I picked up the grocery’s before dropping it in the cart, I just make a mental note of the price, and one after another I do the calculations in my head, and when I get up to the checkout, sometimes I’m only pence out from the cashiers total.

 

 

And another thing, when I was training to be an engineer, there was a strict ruling in the classroom, no calculators, all your mathematical equations had to work out from your head to paper, and if you got in trouble with an arithmetical problem, your hands went up to get your tutors attention. My engineering course ended with excellent results and a passed with a qualified certificate which allowed me to work for most engineering company working with special alloyed, carbide and tungsten metals and tools, which I did for a short period until the next better job came along in management.

 

 

As per Hammer, this is very worrying indeed, young men and women today cannot add or subtract. Pre my retirement my engineering training was significant for me going into Management, over a period of 5-6 years worked for 2 companies as a production manager…. shop floor staff around 150 guys, and as you are aware most shop floor staff today have a daily job sheet, whatever you do is a log for proficiency bonuses and productions targets, in numerical order, and what amazes me to see young men with families constantly knocking my office door asking me how to complete his job sheet for the day. Have to say they never lasted long working for me.

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