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leww37334

Morning High blood sugar

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leww37334

I am a type 2 diabetic I am dieting.   I do not take insulin.  Yesterday I ate 750 calories 77 gm  carbohydrate. At 900 pm blood glucose was 104  this morning before breakfast it was 143  I tried eating small amounts of non carbohydrate food before bed  that has not worked.  I need ideas

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Dowling

This morning before breakfast doesn't give us much info.  How long after getting out of bed did you test? If you were up for an hour or so your liver would have dumped glucose to give you energy. If you tested soon after getting up you may have what is called dawn phenomenon and really it's not anything to worry about. Try eating something that has a few carbs and protein before bed

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meyery2k

You may be experiencing dawn phenomenon where your liver dumps glucose into your blood stream to provide the energy to wake up and start your day.  Trying to lower your carbs even more might help some.  Many of us here target for 50gm a day, a few even less.  The carbs you do eat should be high quality carbs.  Strictly avoid starches like bread, rice, pasta, grain products, and root vegetables even if you decide to stay at 75gm carbs a day.  These are readily broken down into glucose.  Instead, try nuts and non-root vegetables.  While these have carbs, they are more complex carbs which are converted more slowly.

 

750 calories a day is not much.  Eating too little to lose weight might not be the best strategy.  When I was first diagnosed, I weighed 313 lbs. and was a waist size 44.  I also (surprise!) discovered I was diabetic which gave me the reason to change.  I was prescribed Metformin, given a pat on the back, referred to the ADA website, and sent on my way.  I found this website which is almost the opposite of what the ADA suggested as far as a diet.  Many posters commented the ADA diet was killing them and they would simply end up taking more medicine to counter the increasing glucose.  I was initially skeptical and gave the advice here a try.  Long story short, it worked for me.  I lost 100 lbs in a year, became fit enough to run 5K and ride a bicycle dozens of miles.  I was able to stop taking Metformin and am able to keep my diabetes under control for now with diet and exercise.  My doctor became a convert to LCHF when he saw the transformation.  My lipids are excellent.

 

Back to diet.  750 calories a day would be miserable for me.  I have to circle back to that.  I was a 49 y/o inactive male 6'0.  The suggested caloric intake for me was 1500 calories a day.  I used fats instead of carbs and I ended up settling at 1800 calories as my energy increased and I became more active.  I actually concentrated on glucose control and everything else seemed to take care of itself.  If I ate the right foods, 1500-1800 calories was enough until my metabolism reset to my being more active.  Don't fall into the trap that if 1500 calories is recommended 750 is better.  It isn't.  Your body goes into starvation mode and consumes muscle (protein) which also can be broken down into glucose.  You also will not get enough vitamins, minerals, and other micro nutrients.  Eating fat does not make you fat.  I don't count calories anymore.  My weigh stabilized at about 225 (waist 36) which is more due to muscle mass from cycling.  I have a little bit of abdominal fat that I just can't get rid of but I believe that is simply a byproduct of metabolic disorder.

 

Have you considered or tried Metformin?  It helped me at first.  It is also believed to be a mild appetite suppressant which can help with losing weight.

 

Look at eating good quality fats.  Fat does not seem to be the enemy it is promoted to be.  I lost my weight and ate bacon and eggs for breakfast nearly every day.  I sauteed mushrooms and vegetables to replace the rice, toast, tortillas, or pancakes I used to eat.  Lunch and dinner was high quality proteins with more veggies and salads.  Nuts, ranch dressing, and other fats would help keep me full.  Healthy weight loss is a slow process.  Be patient.  It is a long term game.  I would lose about 10 pounds a month,

 

Exercise, if you are not already.  Walking is fine.  My first 75 pounds, I would walk at least 10,000 steps a day.  Walk 2, rest 1.  

 

This is getting to be a long post so I will cut it here.  I get passionate about the subject because I was there and, while it takes some work to not be there, it can be done.

 

I hope you stick around.  Check out recipes in the forum for ideas on eating.  You don't have to starve yourself to lose weight and live with diabetes.  ~ Mike

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leww37334
2 hours ago, Dowling said:

This morning before breakfast doesn't give us much info.  How long after getting out of bed did you test? If you were up for an hour or so your liver would have dumped glucose to give you energy. If you tested soon after getting up you may have what is called dawn phenomenon and really it's not anything to worry about. Try eating something that has a few carbs and protein before bed   tested about 30 minutes after getting up, before eating anything

 

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leww37334

Should have mentioned I take .5 mg ozempic weekly and 2x500 mg metformin daily  also carbs yesterday came from apple, high fiber cereal and caprese

Edited by leww37334
more info

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leww37334
17 minutes ago, leww37334 said:

tested about 30 minutes after getting up, before eating anything   complicating things my diverticulitis requires high fiber which is hard to get without carbs

 

Edited by leww37334

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meyery2k
5 hours ago, leww37334 said:

Should have mentioned I take .5 mg ozempic weekly and 2x500 mg metformin daily  also carbs yesterday came from apple, high fiber cereal and caprese

Cereal is never a good thing for me.  Did you have dairy milk on the cereal?  The lactose in the milk is a sugar that will be converted to glucose quite readily.  The apple too would not work for me, depending on how much.  Have you tried eating to your meter?  Meaning, test before a meal, eat, test 2 hours after.  If you are near to where you started, that is good.  If you are much higher then something has spiked.  Taking the apple as an example, if you find a whole apple spiked you, then next time, try half.  You may find a happy place where you can eat a certain quantity of apple.  I find this to be the case with berries.  The thinking here is to try and avoid swings from normal to over 140 then back to normal.  Moderating those swings will yield a better a1C and overall better management of diabetes.

 

If the cost of strips seems to high, Walmart has a Relion meter and usually 50 strips for $20 or so.

 

Could non root vegetables like zucchini, cauliflower, asparagus, broccoli, and so on give you the fiber required and not be harmful as far as diverticulitis?   Yes, these foods have carbs but they are more complex carbs than the starch in cereal or the fructose in an apple.  Unfortunately, sugar is sugar, whether it is sucrose from refined sugar cane or fructose from fruit.

 

Again, 750 calories (assuming you are trying to do this daily), really doesn't give a lot of options and puts far greater stress on you since you will be in starvation mode.

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Dowling
2 hours ago, meyery2k said:

 

 

Again, 750 calories (assuming you are trying to do this daily), really doesn't give a lot of options and puts far greater stress on you since you will be in starvation mode.

I agree750 calories is starvation mode and unsustainable in the long run. If it's fiber you need you for diverticulitis you can get it without the cereal and apples. Try eating flax and other seed meals and nuts. Flax has 7.6g of fiber in 1/4 cup that's almost double the fiber you get from an apple. The carbs in flax are mitigated by the grams of fiber.

 

If it's cereal you crave look up low carb granola. It is made with nuts and seeds and would give you lots of fiber. You can make muffins in a mug with almond and flax meal or make a dozen muffins and freeze them for future use or make a hot cereal with the same ingredients. Most of the time these are my choices for breakfast. I just couldn't eat eggs every day. My A1C is in the 5's and has been for years

 

Let your mouse wander through the web. There are plenty of low carb options on line or look through our recipe section for options. Just because you were told those things would help your diverticulitis they are not the only options. You have to strike a balance to help both conditions at the same time and develop a diet you can stick to for a life time

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leww37334

Cereal  has 33 gms carb  18 of which is fiber and 90 cal no milk  don't really know about glycemic index.  Livonga meter from blue cross  strips are free

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meyery2k

Respectfully - In cereal, whatever is not fiber is starch or, possibly, added sugar.  Starch is a simple carb and is broken down into glucose quickly.  This is why we are saying grains, rice, flour, pasta, and root vegetables should be avoided.  There are much healthier alternatives than cereal when it comes to diabetes.  When I was first adapting, the nut cereal, flax cereal, and keto microwave muffins helped wean me away from the bread, potatoes, rice, and cereal I thought I had to have.  Glycemic index is a useful data point but lactose is still sugar.  You can see if these things affect you or not by eating to your meter.  That was an extremely educational process for me.  I was going to be the diabetic that would eat tortillas.  Well, I discovered that couldn't happen.  The equivalent carbs in non root vegetables will have a greatly reduced effect on your glucose than cereal will.  Those carbs are more complex and break down more slowly.

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ShottleBop

I have eaten an avocado for breakfast nearly every morning for the past decade (and more).  Doesn't affect my blood sugar and provides a lot of fiber.  As others have suggested, there are nonstarchy veggies that provide decent amounts of fiber, as well.  Someone has mentioned flaxseed.  You might try a porridge made from 1/4 cup each ground flaxseed and almond meal, flavore with sugar-free syrup.  Mix those, then add enough boiling water to give you the consistency you want, and let it steep for a few minutes. 

100% chocolate is also a low-carb friendly source of fiber.  Takes a little getting used to, but it works.   If you have a Trader Joe's near you, try the Montezuma's Absolute Black.  It's 93 % cacao and 7% roasted cacao nibs which give it a slightly sweet, nutty taste.  25 grams gives you 6 grams of carbs, of which 4 are fiber, 14 grams fat, and 3 grams protein.  

Costco carries a Nuttzo keto butter (made from several different nuts).  2 tbsp gives you 18 grams of fat, 6 grams of carbs (of which 4 are fiber), and 4 grams protein.

 

Good luck!

 

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leww37334
On 9/25/2020 at 8:55 PM, meyery2k said:

Respectfully - In cereal, whatever is not fiber is starch or, possibly, added sugar.  Starch is a simple carb and is broken down into glucose quickly.  This is why we are saying grains, rice, flour, pasta, and root vegetables should be avoided.  There are much healthier alternatives than cereal when it comes to diabetes.  When I was first adapting, the nut cereal, flax cereal, and keto microwave muffins helped wean me away from the bread, potatoes, rice, and cereal I thought I had to have.  Glycemic index is a useful data point but lactose is still sugar.  You can see if these things affect you or not by eating to your meter.  That was an extremely educational process for me.  I was going to be the diabetic that would eat tortillas.  Well, I discovered that couldn't happen.  The equivalent carbs in non root vegetables will have a greatly reduced effect on your glucose than cereal will.  Those carbs are more complex and break down more slowly.

 

Edited by leww37334

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stevenal
On 9/28/2020 at 10:51 AM, leww37334 said:

Cereal box shows 0 gms   Total sugars

Sugars are only one type of carb. Look at the carbohydrate grams. Also look at the serving size. All they need to do is adjust the serving size to get the number desired.

Starch is not included in the total sugar number even though it is easily separated into simple sugars during digestion as indicated above.

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Peppe89

Q: “What should I do if my blood sugar, 1 hour after eating continually, reaches 114? For the past few days, I wake up with my blood glucose between 92 - 127 mg/dl, so in the mornings my blood glucose is high, but after eating, it’s low. What should I do?”

As Saul Goad recommended, do what your doctor tells you to do. But here’s some blood glucose guidelines for you.

Non-diabetics’ BG (Blood Glucose) ranges from about 90 to 120 mg/dl all day long, with some drops into the 80s mg/dl, and some (brief) spikes into the 140’s mg/dl. It spends 80% of the day BELOW 100 mg/dl. The low end is the fasting and pre-meal level, the high end is the post-meal “peak”. The peak occurs anywhere from about 45 to 90 minutes after a meal… but is back BELOW 100 mg/dl by an hour after the peak - so about 2 hours after the meal for most folks.

SO… your BG is well within the non-diabetic range; though you’d expect it to be a bit higher 1 hour after meals - it’s NOT “low”. 114 is simply a few points below the typical non-diabetic’s MAX. Though the fasting is sometimes higher; 101 to 125 mg/dl is considered “pre-diabetic”; 126 and higher is “diabetic”. Since you cite 92 to 126 mg/dl, you’re evidently “crossing the line” SOME of the time… but not always; that’s an indication of a problem, but you’re not “out of control”. For otherwise healthy diabetic patients, the AACE (American Ass’n of Clinical Endocrinologists) recommends a level of NO MORE than 110 mg/dl.

 

Assuming you’re under a doctor’s care… consult with him/her; if not, see one, and discuss your findings and how to proceed. Good luck! 
 

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leww37334

For otherwise healthy diabetic patients, the AACE (American Ass’n of Clinical Endocrinologists) recommends a level of NO MORE than 110 mg/dl. ?  Is that realistic for a diabetic?   That would be an a1c of about 5.5  not achievable for me.   More likely that is fasting

Edited by leww37334

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meyery2k

I believe, since there can be many reasons to present with diabetes, it depends upon the individual.  When I was first diagnosed my a1C was 8.5 and my fasting glucose was 300+.  With diet and exercise my a1C is consistently under 5 and my fasting is under 100 a good 99% of the days.

 

I believe my main problem is that I am insulin resistant so if I eat too many carbs, the insulin does not allow me to really utilize the glucose.  This then seems to set up a feedback loop where I am literally starving in the midst of plenty.  The insulin will result in weight gain if I continue with a carb heavy diet.

 

The last time, I really had a problem with glucose was when I was in the hospital a few days last year.  I had an IV with steroids and dextrose.  My fasting was in the 150's while I was in hospital and for a few days after I went home.  Triple witching of infection, steroids, and dextrose.  Knowing how you are broken can provide a great deal of insight into working around it.

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leww37334

Berberine, Ginseng, Cinnamon, & More!   Gluco contents,  have tried  both Ginseng and Cinnamon  neither worked

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