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Dowling

Vitamin D3 and Covid 19

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Dowling

I just heard of an interesting study from Spain. They tested 216 people in 1 Spanish hospital with Covid and found 80% of them were deficient in Vitamin D3 compared to 47 % of people without Covid 19.

 

The conclusion was that while Vitamin D3 won't cure Covid 19 or prevent you from getting it, it may help fight it off if you do get it. Nothing proven but on the off chance that I may get it I'd like all the help I could get. I'm glad I take 2000 IU daily and have for years. Vitamin D3 preforms many functions in the body. The main function for this study is that it boosts the immune system. If you get lots of colds and flu you may be deficient in this vitamin. A simple blood test can tell you if this is true. In any case Vitamin D3 is one of the cheapest vitamins. 2000IU is the normal dose and you should not exceed 4000IU daily.

 

Vitamin D3 is called the sunshine vitamin because we get most of our Vitamin D3 from the sun. However if you live in a climate that gets snow you must take a supplement because the sun is too far from the equator and too high in winter to give off Vitamin D3. It is typically the vitamin that people in those areas are deficient in.

 

Go to this link to see just what Vitamin D3 does for the body  https://healthyfocus.org/vitamin-d3-benefits/

 

 

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meyery2k

I know it is irreverent, but I can bring this up with the dermatologist when he gets on me for all the sun exposure.  I listen and wear sleeves and a cap but I still get a lot more exposure to the sun than is probably good for me.  Sunscreen only works so much.

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Hammer

I've been taking this D3 supplement for years.  My supplement is a 5000 IU gel cap.  Maybe that might explain why I haven't had the flu in more that 40 years, or a cold in more than 12 years?...probably not, but it's interesting to think that it might be helping.

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Dowling
14 minutes ago, Hammer said:

I've been taking this D3 supplement for years.  My supplement is a 5000 IU gel cap.  Maybe that might explain why I haven't had the flu in more that 40 years, or a cold in more than 12 years?...probably not, but it's interesting to think that it might be helping.

 

Yes Hammer it probably helped but no one could prove that. I too get very few colds and flu. I did have the flu after Christmas last year. My family was home for a week and my grandson had the flu. It raged through both our and my sons wife's family. I'm not usually in close contact with sick people for that long. Before that it had been around 5 years with no cold or flu. I've been taking 2000IU of vitamin D3 daily for around 20 years. I started taking it for my bones but finding out it helps the immune system is a bonus. It's interesting to note that 50% of people are deficient in Vitamin D3

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Hammer
17 minutes ago, Dowling said:

 

Yes Hammer it probably helped but no one could prove that. I too get very few colds and flu. I did have the flu after Christmas last year. My family was home for a week and my grandson had the flu. It raged through both our and my sons wife's family. I'm not usually in close contact with sick people for that long. Before that it had been around 5 years with no cold or flu. I've been taking 2000IU of vitamin D3 daily for around 20 years. I started taking it for my bones but finding out it helps the immune system is a bonus. It's interesting to note that 50% of people are deficient in Vitamin D3

 

I've been taking D3 for years because the blood pressure pill that I take makes me photosensitive, so I can't be exposed to the sun for too long.  The most sun that I get is when I mow the lawn, and I can see that my arms, which are exposed, are slightly sunburned each time I mow.

 

Speaking of being around sick people, years ago, I was working on a construction site where they were erecting a pharmaceutical plant.  A building like this can't have windows that open, so in the summer time, they had to install a huge, temporary air conditioning/heating duct system.  It recirculated the air in the building, but the contractor was cheap and didn't want to pay to install the proper filters in it, so it just recirculated the air.  Needless to say, everyone on the job site came down with either a cold, usually the flu, and sometimes pneumonia.  We told all new hires that they would get one of those three things, and most of them did in the first week they were there.  I was there for 8 months and I never got it. I think that I was the only person to not get sick.

Edited by Hammer

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buddy7
On 10/27/2020 at 9:20 PM, Dowling said:

Vitamin D3 is called the sunshine vitamin because we get most of our Vitamin D3 from the sun. However if you live in a climate that gets snow you must take a supplement because the sun is too far from the equator and too high in winter to give off Vitamin D3. It is typically the vitamin that people in those areas are deficient in.

I see my DSNs Nurse at least 3 times a year for my diabetes, and what kind of worries me. She always told me I’m lacking sunlight, so she gives me 28 cholecalciferol 1000 units’ capsules 1 per day. How much Vitamin D is too much before it becomes Toxic? I also take ultra-vitamin D 1000 IU from my pharmacist non-prescription, but may I add not together, when one runs out, then I take the other. As a rule, I generally start these courses in the winter months, when there’s less sunshine about. Does this matter? There are people on the Globe i.e. Greenland who only see the sunshine 2-3 months per year, how does this affect them medically?

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Dowling
3 hours ago, buddy7 said:

I see my DSNs Nurse at least 3 times a year for my diabetes, and what kind of worries me. She always told me I’m lacking sunlight, so she gives me 28 cholecalciferol 1000 units’ capsules 1 per day. How much Vitamin D is too much before it becomes Toxic? I also take ultra-vitamin D 1000 IU from my pharmacist non-prescription, but may I add not together, when one runs out, then I take the other. As a rule, I generally start these courses in the winter months, when there’s less sunshine about. Does this matter? There are people on the Globe i.e. Greenland who only see the sunshine 2-3 months per year, how does this affect them medically?

 

cholecalciferol us vitaminD3 so you are getting 1000IU of vitamin D3 from them the same as your non prescription and you could take them both together for a total of 2000IU. That is the daily dose I have taken for the last 18 years. Every day year round. It is recommended that you not exceed 4000IU daily.

 

Saying you are lacking sunlight is another way of saying your vitamin D3 levels are low. Your Doctor must test your levels with your blood test.

 

Where you live I'd take Vitamin D3 year round. Those cloudy days in summer aren't giving you vitamin D3 and unless you spend at least 15 minutes in the sun daily you are not getting enough vitamin D. Those people in Greenland and the Arctic eat a lot of fish and even seal that are natural sources of vitamin D3. Fish especially salmon is the only natural food that contains vitamin D3. Milk, Some orange juice and some cereal do have vitamin D added in small amounts.

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Zoe Sparks

 

Found this on one blog: 

 

Diabetes Management in The Times of COVID-19

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you know that this condition requires daily monitoring. You need to take your medication as prescribed, watch your diet carefully, and make sure that you maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Making sure your diabetes is well-controlled is even more important during the Covid-19 pandemic because any long-term illness that you have puts you at a greater risk of suffering serious symptoms if you contract the virus. As many of us with diabetes know all too well, diabetes is an illness that can easily slip out of control if we let our guards down.

With this pandemic around, we can’t afford to let that happen.

However, we do have some good news. In an informational article on how Covid-19 impacts people with diabetes, ADA states, “your risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 is likely to be lower if your diabetes is well-managed.”

This means that one of the best preventive measures you can take as a diabetic patient is to do everything that you can to ensure that your diabetes is well-controlled. This involves taking your medications as prescribed, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and paying more attention to your diet.

One of the best ways to stay fit is to watch what you eat; ensure that you eat healthy foods that are nutritious and not too high in sugar. Remember – eating healthy doesn’t have to mean eating foods that you don’t like! With some planning, you can have a healthy diet that is both tasty and flavorful.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle while diabetic is entirely possible. With the Covid-19 pandemic still circulating, make sure that you take all the necessary precautions. Remember, simply ensuring your diabetes is well-controlled goes a long way to fighting this deadly virus.

 

 

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Diana_CT

Back when I was Dx in 2012 with diabetes besides starting me off with insulin my endo also had me taking Vitamin D.

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halia

I've been taking 2000IU D3 for 2 years and my last flu was back in 2018. I'm sure D3 can really boost our immune system especially this rainy season. 

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