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yellowblanket

Monitoring

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yellowblanket

I have been taking metformin for MANY years (I'd guess seven) due to insulin resistance.  At some point, I moved into pre-diabetic land.  I'm not sure when.  I know it has been years.  I have been with the same doctor this whole time.  She has never prescribed me a monitor and has never asked me to monitor.  When my (now ex) husband got the diabetes diagnosis from the same doc, she was proactive about getting him diabetic counseling and a monitor.  But he rarely used the monitor and never changed his eating habits.  As far as I know (pre divorce), she doesn't get onto him about any of it. But I don't have to worry about him anymore.  Anywho.... now that I think about it, the doc did mention that I MIGHT want to start monitoring my blood sugar, but never seemed very concerned.  She never asks me about it.  Never seems concerned.  But then again, I've seen it written that pre-diabetes is still diabetes.  Do I need a new doc? Or is it too soon for me to be concerned?  She seemed to take it so likely, that I never changed my eating habits either.  She asks me to lose weight, but that seems like a general concern and not one directed at the pre-diabetes. Thoughts?

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yellowblanket

Also, she said last month that my insulin is only mildly improved from September's test, and that she wants me to add Trulicity.  If I'm maxed out on Metformin, and she wants to add Trulicity, can I really still be considered PRE-diabetic?

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adiantum

Welcome yellowblanket. What an grand  opportunity for you to take a new direction on your lifes journey.

New year... ex partner ... & now that you have found us, you have found your personal trainers .

We will help you all we can so you can   take control of your health as a diabetic.

 

I'm one that doesnt believe in pre d,  but  your doctor might be looking at your blood work & consider it under the D line.

 

Lets look at your pathology results before recomending you change doctors.

I wonder if your doctor suspects you dont comprehend the the hows & why's of diabetes & is just doing her best to help you with medications.

 

what was your last two A1c 's?

what is your usual foods you consume?

do you test your blood glucose after meals or when trying new foods?

 

May I suggest you start reading up on diabets, & on your next visit you ask the questions. allow her to see that you are learning & keen to take control.

 

Ask her what your lab readings are.

Even more important is that you start counting carbs.

At first 100g carbs a day but please realise that is very generous & one day you will need to get it down to about 30g a day.

Exercise is essential to keep the blood flowing freely & oxegenated.

Walking is the easiest regime to begin with  & its up to you to increase your pace, distance & degree of difficulty.

 

May 2021 be the beginning of a new & exciting way of life for you.

Post often & let us help you.

 

~Lee

 

 

 

 

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meyery2k

When I was first diagnosed, this group helped me change things around.  No more Metformin, A1c in the 4's, fasting BG usually under 100, lost 100 pounds, and became a cycling beast.

 

The people here live with diabetes, they know what they are doing.  I believe pre-diabetes is diabetes.  Just not severe enough to take sterner measure.

 

If you have Walmart near you, get a Relion Prime meter and strips.  Meters are cheap, strips are not.  Relion is among the cheapest.  If your doctor will give you a prescription for a meter and strips, go for it.  I am only allowed one strip a day.  When I was dialing things in, I needed to test several times a day but, now that I have it dialed in, I just test randomly in addition to my morning test.

 

Mike

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yellowblanket

Thank for for your welcoming post. I do have a lot to learn. My last a1c was only 5.4 in September last year. My previous a1c was only 5.6, and that was taken in June of 2018. In 2014, I was 6.1, so it has gotten quite a bit better with medication.  Doc doesn't appear to order the a1c test often enough if you ask me. 

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yellowblanket

I had a monitor at one point that I bought myself, but rarely used. I have no idea where it is. Seems like it's a good time for a new one. 

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yellowblanket

When the doc orders glucose and insulin tests, they always come back high. But I don't know what levels to actually look for. 

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meyery2k

They are a little pricey, but there are at home A1c tests.  My experience with them against the lab work demonstrates good results.

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adiantum

It's been 3 months since your last A1c  which is  time for those cells to have been replaced  & a new test is due.

Your doctor could be at the belief that its pre d until it reaches ?6.4 but I see it as D especially as your already on meds.

 

Of course it's your call to get a new GP or not.............. I'd not, unless your going to run into your ex there.

what country are you in?

I ask as in Australia we can get free monitors & very cheap test strips.

In the US you can get cheap at walmart

 

I firmly believe a low carb/high fat nutrition pattern & a nice daily walk will give you great results.

 

 

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Dowling

I had a doctor like yours once. He bent over backwards for the male patients and discounted females. My husband thought he was wonderful but I wasn't so sure but I stayed with him because I had no major health concerns. That was a bad mistake. Because he never sent me for a bone density test after menopause at 62 years old I developed Osteoporosis, fell broke my hip and ended up with a hip replacement and a year of absolute H-ll. 

 

 If you are looking for advice I'd tell you to take control your self. Make an appointment, demand a hbA1C and a monitor or buy one your self. Your hbA1C should be below 7--we like ours under 6. Most newbies get a hbA1c every 3 months. Once you gain control it can go to every 6 months or even a year. Because it gives you a better idea of how you are doing over a longer period it's a good thing to do. Glucometer meters give you a snapshot in time and a good way to make sure you are staying on track.

 

Go on a low carb high fat diet--going keto is a good start. If you are over weight this will lose some on a low carb high fat diet. I lost 40 pounds when I started. Start taking readings with the monitor. Take one in the morning on waking. It should be around 80 to 100. Take a reading before you eat and at 2 hours after. Your reading should be close to your premeal reading.

 

Your doctor was stringing you a line. I don't know of any doctor who gives Metforman to someone who they consider pre-diabetic. An A1C of 5.6 is good for a diabetic taking Metforman. A prediabetic or should I say new diabetic should be able to control BG with diet aloneDon't have any qualms about changing doctors if you feel that he is not treating you the way you think he should be treated. It's your health not his and you are the one who will suffer the consequences

 

I presume you are American. That's why I gave numbers of readings in the way American's do. If you are not then post again and I'll give you the numbers other countries use.

Edited by Dowling

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yellowblanket

I am in the US. 

 

I originally started the metformin to treat insulin resistance. 

 

I generally adore my doc. She has a great bedside manner. My ex goes to her as well though. As does our kid. We have seen her for a long time. BUT we moved an hour away from her a few years ago and have been making the drive to see her. I guess it's time for a new primary. 

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adiantum

I think diet & exercise is the best way to treat insulin resistance. By diet I dont mean crazy self depriving punishing foods like carrot sticks.

High fat/ low carb HF/LC  is a real good way of life that seems more natural then the word diet. BTW carrot sticks are high carb as are  most root vegetables.

Save yourself that hours journey & get a new doctor, anyone can have that good bedside manner , besides  then your really free of the ex.

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yellowblanket

I agree that I need a new primary. I always plan to change, and then some health issue pops up and I think "I will just wait for this to be over and then I'll switch". After this ruptured disc, I'll switch. I hope there's nothing that pops up right away after this issue. 

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Hammer

As others mentioned, you can get a low priced meter at WalMart.  If you get this meter, you will need a lancing device, as well as lancets and test strips.  You can also get an at home A1C test kit.  This kit comes with 4 test strips, whereas most other ones come with only two, so this kit allows you to take four readings. You should only test your A1C every three months, as your blood cells live for three months, and the test measures that average glucose levels in your blood cells over a three month period, so testing your A1C in less than three months means that you would be testing the same blood cells as in the previous test, so you might get the same reading for both tests.

 

I agree with your comments about doctors treating female patients differently than male patients, and I think that is really pathetic.  They are both paying the same for the office visit, so they should be treated the same.  I asked my previous doctor why this is so, and he said that a lot of doctors (not him) feel that women patients come in with frivolous complaints, so doctors don't take them as seriously as they do male patients, because when a male patient comes in, he usually waits until he's half dead before he seeks medical treatment, so the doctor knows that if the man is in his office, he has some serious issues, otherwise the man wouldn't have come in.  While this may be true, I still think that women patients should be taken more seriously, as they are paying the same for the office visit.

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Dowling
12 hours ago, Hammer said:

I asked my previous doctor why this is so, and he said that a lot of doctors (not him) feel that women patients come in with frivolous complaints, so doctors don't take them as seriously as they do male patients, because when a male patient comes in, he usually waits until he's half dead before he seeks medical treatment, so the doctor knows that if the man is in his office, he has some serious issues, otherwise the man wouldn't have come in.  While this may be true, I still think that women patients should be taken more seriously, as they are paying the same for the office visit.

 

Now that makes me mad and sad too. On 1 hand they say that things are easier to treat and your chances of a cure are better if things are caught early and then some doctors don't listen when women take things seriously and see a doctor. Those same doctors give men credit for waiting until it's too late.

 

Your doctor was right though --that's the way it is. As a rule women take their health seriously and some men ignore symptoms and only see a doctor when things are dire. I call that the macho effect. My husband was one of those men and he might still be alive if he had listened to me and seen a doctor sooner. The fact that women see a doctor sooner rather than later might be the reason that statistics say women live longer than men.

 

That quack doctor that we had carried his bias over to children. When my son was sick I had to say my husband thinks he should see you or he would dismiss me out of hand. If I had been smart enough then I should have found another doctor for me and my son but because we were both relatively healthy and his office was convenient I didn't.

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Diana_CT

My endo is an APRN and she is great!

I had her since 2004 when I saw her for another endocrine problem, she kept on telling me that my A1C was creeping up way back then and to watch my carbs.

 

Which brings me back to another pet peeve. 

I never knew that my grandmother and my mother were diabetic. In those days nobody talked about diseases and if they had maybe I would have taken better care of myself (But probably not since I was young and like other kids I thought of myself being immortal.)

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Hammer
5 hours ago, meyery2k said:

Not so fun fact.  The term hysteria originates from the Greek word for uterus (hysterus).

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hysteria

 

 

Mike, years ago I watched a movie called Hysteria, which is what they used to call it back in the 1880's when a woman had an orgasm, and how this led to Dr. Mortimer Granville creating the first vibrator.

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