Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Hammer

And you think cell phones are good?

Recommended Posts

Hammer

I wanted to post this in an older thread, but that thread was closed, so I thought that I'd start a new thread because I wanted the members here to know this.  A lot of people here know that I hate cell phones.  The cell phone that I have, my daughter lent me.  It's never turned on, and I never take it with me, unless I'm going to be driving a good distance away, then I take it, in case I break down.

 

Okay, here's the deal....I don't know if they have this in other countries, but here in the US, we have Netflix.  There are two types of subscriptions that you can get with them.  I have the subscription where I can order movies on DVD to be delivered to my house, and I can have up to three movies from them at my house, at any given time.  The other option is to have their movies streamed to your TV set, which means that you have to have your TV set connected to the internet so that you can get those movies streamed to you.

 

Now, I just watched a Youtube channel, that I watch every day, and the host typically has on several guests, and they discuss the topics of the day.  The host said that he went to a dog store with a friend to buy a dog, but they ended up not getting a dog. (I didn't know they had dog stores, only pet stores, but I digress).  He said that, later that day, when he got home, he turned on his TV, and went to watch a Netflix movie, since he had their streaming service.  The movie was constantly showing dog food commercials.  It dawned on him that somehow, the advertising of dog food commercials was being specifically directed at him, and he wondered how anyone knew that he had visited a dog store, since he didn't mention it to anyone.  He analyzed it for a while and realized that, he had his cell phone on him when he visited the dog store, and his cell phone's GPS location indicated where he was, so that information was somehow relayed to Netflix, so that they could bombard him with dog food commercials.

 

Think about that!  Your cell phone is spying on you, and giving who knows who, information that they can use to track your every move!  Keep in mind that you can use voice commands on your cell phone to access websites, right?  That means that your cell phone is able to hear your every word, so who knows who is listening to everything that you are saying?

 

No thanks, my cell phone is staying on my desk, and is being turned off all of the time.  Good luck to everyone who carries their cell phones with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
janice21475

I agree with you about Cell Phones. I have a FlipPhone but it does not have a mind of it's own and is only turned on when I want to make a call. Plus, with this little phone, if it is turned off, it is off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diana_CT
2 hours ago, janice21475 said:

I agree with you about Cell Phones. I have a FlipPhone but it does not have a mind of it's own and is only turned on when I want to make a call. Plus, with this little phone, if it is turned off, it is off.

Unfortunately flip phones are going to become obsolete.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/3g-networks-sunsets-phone-upgrades

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dowling

I have a cell phone. I bought it outright so I could choose my plan. My plan has no data so no one is going to be keeping tabs on it. I don't need data. I have my computer at home and I can use WIFI if necessary. There are so many places these days that have WIFI but I've never had to use it. I got my phone for the convenience of a portable phone and texting. 

 

I was on a trip to see my sister. My bus was very late. I had to switch buses for the last little jaunt and I missed my connection. She was to meet my bus and I knew she'd worry if I wasn't there. I went to a pay phone and called reversing the charges to my phone. When I got home and got my phone bill that 10 minute call cost me $16.95. I nearly croaked. That's when I decided to get a cell phone. It would have cost me nothing if I'd had it. I used it occasionally when I was in a store or just out to contact my husband about something but mostly it stayed in my purse. When my husband was sick and in the hospital it was a God send and a lifeline between my son and me. I use it occasionally to contact friends or for them to contact me.

 

I never have it attached to my ear and I never miss not having data. Mostly it says in my purse but I wouldn't be without it. It is a great convenience if you use it the right way

 

As for those ads you are targeted on the computer too but there's not much you can do about it except x them out. What makes anyone think or be surprised by getting ads on a cell phone with data. If you don't want ads on your cell phone ditch the data. A cell phone with data is just a small computer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
don1942

To replace my old flip phone, I bought a discontinued Samsung Galaxy smart phone in Walmart and added it to my existing  Verizon plan for $.75 per month for 36 months. My Verizon plan, which includes a veteran’s discount, costs abpout $23/month. I don’t text and use under 100 minutes per month.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

What irritates me about cell phones, is that, because most people have them, the cost of my landline phone has been slowly increasing, since a lot of people ditch their landline when they get a cell phone.  My landline used to cost $25 a month.  It has now slowly increased to $50 a month.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dowling
4 hours ago, Hammer said:

What irritates me about cell phones, is that, because most people have them, the cost of my landline phone has been slowly increasing, since a lot of people ditch their landline when they get a cell phone.  My landline used to cost $25 a month.  It has now slowly increased to $50 a month.  

 

Yes Hammer. That irritates me too. I have thought about ditching my land line and just using my cell. The trouble is that I find cell phones not as clear as my land line. Besides which I'd have to give my number out to people that aren't in my circle and that would get me spam calls and I'd be forever digging it out of my purse or I'd have to leave it out and maybe forget it when I go out. That would leave me without a phone when I might need it. Often my cell goes dead because I forget to charge it and that's another reason. I don't want to be without a phone.

 

However I think we are whipping a dead horse. It won't be long before Phone companies will no longer offer land line service and we are pushed into using cell service. They call that progress but sometimes progress stinks

Edited by Dowling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ran23

Because I was retired my wife added a new gen 3G flip-phone for me years ago.  Now I may actually get a smart phone. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buddy7

I’m Samsung cell phone users, this may have happened to you, at some time. “It just drives me bananas”. Must have just got back from KFC some time ago, around 15.30 hrs. Later on, that evening as like most smartphone users, thought I’d have a browse to catch-up on current activities i.e. Bank details, emails, Facebook and so on. The first message I got, stated hope you enjoyed your KFC meal this evening, and as I browsed on further these messages kept popping up, they must have covered my activities up to some 6 months back, they told me the places I visited in that period, shopping at my local Supermarket stores, shopping at the Intu Lakeside shopping complex, detailing the number of stores by name I’ve been in, How many times I’ve been to my Bank, two visits to my Lawyer, a local shopping area by name, a place I frequently visited, at least once or twice a month, they even targeted my local Hospital where I had recent appointments.

 

Yes, you can say I’m a little peed-off, with all that information my cell phone Network had collated about me. I’d like to think I’m not a naive person, given the history of the cell phone, I also like to think I’m pretty clued-up how they go about with this new technology. What annoys me most, is how they used it, to their advantage. So to any cell phone users out there. The whole smartphone scenario has been one of the most misinformed, opaque, method of drip-feeding vital information from you, UNKNOWINGLY, probably one of the worst malpractice known to us this century, and the way I see it, things are just in its infancy of the technology. So to all cell phone users, locating tracking have the technology to collect your information, just be vigilant. Your privacy is completely deceased/expired, you’re no longer anonymous.

 

That said, the cell phone over the years has become a convenient lifestyle, and we’ve got used to its dependence, out of the 5.1 billion users worldwide, none of us would be going out tomorrow and dumping our phones? With a generated economic value, an industry of $4.8 Trillion worldwide, do you think the manufactures, gives a toss? Certainly not for one individual, they are making money and loads of it.

 

However on hindsight, there are times I wish I took heed, never to own a smartphone handset, per, my learned colleague ‘Hammer’s cautious reminders’, on his post, about not having a cell phone, and the information he so posted. The Film/TV Series ‘Hunted’ USA, which later, was shown on UK TV as a weekly series, the futuristic TV show hinges itself on the locating tracking of cell phone devices. Which is currently used by our UK government, law enforcement officers, to bring criminals to justice.

 

The deepest privacy threat from our cell phones, yet, one that is often completely invisible is the way that they announce your whereabouts all day and all night long through the signals they broadcast. There are at least four ways that an individual phone's location can be tracked by others. In all modern cell phones networks, the operator can calculate where a particular subscriber's phone is located whenever the phone is powered on and registered with the network. The ability to do this results from the way the cell phone network is built and is commonly called triangulation.

 

One way the operator can do this is to observe the signal strength that different towers observe from a particular subscriber's cell phone, and then calculate where that phone must be located to account for these observations. The accuracy with which the operator can figure out a subscriber's location varies depending on many factors, including the technology the operator uses and how many cell towers they have in an area. Very often, it is accurate to about the level of a city block, but in some systems, it can be more accurate.

 

There is no way to hide from this kind of tracking as long as your cell phone is powered on and transmitting signals to an operator's network. Although normally only the cell phone operator itself can perform this kind of tracking. The question to ask, can a government force an operator to turn over location data about a user? The possibility of government access to this sort of data is not theoretical, it is already being widely used by law enforcement agencies in countries like the US and the UK.

 

I take it, Scottish-born Alexander Graham Bell the inventor of the telephone must be aghast in his grave, to see the cell phone, no wires/strings, and can relay conversations and text messages across the world, and 5.2 billion people have one. You can say this is all to do with the advancement of technology.

 

And you think cell phones are good? No, but I won’t do without one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer
1 hour ago, Dowling said:

However I think we are whipping a dead horse. It won't be long before Phone companies will no longer offer land line service and we are pushed into using cell service. They call that progress but sometimes progress stinks

 I doubt that landline services will eventually be discontinued, simply because, a lot of people use landlines to connect to the internet, via DSL, as there is no cable service in their  area.  While Dish Network offers premium TV services in areas that have no cable service, the only way that people in those areas can get online with high speed internet, is with DSL.  If someone needs to use DSL to get high speed internet to their house, they are not going to cancel their phone service, since the phone and high speed internet are run over the same wires, but even if they did cancel their phone service, they would still need their phone lines to get high speed internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dowling

Yes same here but there is a push on to get high speed internet to the whole country. At least there was before covid. It's unfair that some people have to pay exorbitant prices for internet while others don't pay half of what they pay. Once they get your country back on track more than likely some politician will push for it there too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diana_CT
7 hours ago, Hammer said:

 I doubt that landline services will eventually be discontinued, simply because, a lot of people use landline...

I still have my landline, I am in a dead zone for my cellphone and I have extensions allover the house. I don't like VoIP if you lose power it doesn't work and if you call 911 it might not give your location because many people don't set up their emergency contact information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
notme

Hey Hammer,

It appears that everything you have talked about in the past is proving to be pretty much right on.  
 

I haven’t been around much.  Had a move, an accident that set me back for about a year.  Now with this stupid virus, I find myself at home a lot and not wanting to be on the computer nor iPhone.  
 

So, I blew the dust off my trusty Kenwood TM-281 and went back to work setting it all up in our new residence.  I had to buy a new antenna as I wouldn’t let my husband get on the roof to fetch the old on when we moved.  Luckily we found a good company in Oakland that hooked us up with a new one.  We had to get creative with the antenna as the HOA here might holler but we have it worked out.  Fired up that trusty little HAM and bam! Just like I had never taken her down.  
 

I think about you often and your generous help in getting going.  To say I am grateful is not enough.  
 

I feel a sense of community again with my trusty little Kenwood and my mobile Yaesu.

 

listen to Hammer when he tells you to think about HAM.  When the going gets tough the HAM radio community is there for you.  
 

Thanks Hammer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

WooHoo its notme:D

 

 I dont have a smart phone but we down here have had high speed  internet for a few years.

Most people opted to keep their landline only because there was no fee to having it. 

 

I'm not sure if long distance calls are free but local calls are, including the many calls to my cell phone which has a habit  of hiding.

I pay $72.20 Au approx $60US monthly for internet & landline plus $30 Au  bi-monthly for my cell phone.

 

I dont do anything that requires privacy, but often elated when criminals have been recorded at the scene of the crime by their smart phone.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Hi Notme!  I have been wondering if you were okay, since I haven't seen any posts from you for some time.  Good deal on getting that Kenwood back up and running again.  I didn't know that you also had a Yaesu, which model?  I was afraid that you might have lost interest in ham radio, and stopped getting on the air.(it happens to a lot of hams, myself included, which happened some time ago.)

 

Buddy, they don't need to triangulate your cell phone to see where you are, your smartphone has built in GPS, which can locate you down to less than one foot.  Have you ever used the GPS feature on your smartphone?  I think that you need to download an app for that, but I'm not sure which app that is....maybe Goggle Maps? (My daughter loaded in my smartphone for me, so I'm not sure which one it is.)  The thing is, you need an app to find locations, just like you need a Garmin GPS to find locations, but even if you don't have an app on your cell phone to find locations, your cell phone is still connected to the GPS satellites, so other people can see where you are.  This is just one  of a number of reasons that my cell stays turned off, and sitting on my desk, and it doesn't travel with me, unless I'm going to be driving a good distance away, in which case I'll take it in case I break down.

Edited by Hammer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dowling

I just want to comment on something in your original post. It's not about cell phones but it's something everyone should know. NEVER buy a pet from a pet store or on line. Most puppies sold there are from puppy mills and you could be buying trouble. These dogs are raised in deplorable conditions and could have many diseases including Parvo which could kill it.

 

If you want a dog look for a reputable breeder or go to the humane society or consult a vet, Often stray dogs are picked up with puppies. They are treated by a vet, given shots and put up for adoption or you could go for an older dog.. There are plenty of ways to get a pet that doesn't come from a puppy mill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Dowling, I agree 100% with you.  When I first got married, and we lived in an apartment, I knew that my new wife had always had a dog and a cat as pets, so I decided to get her a dog.  I really like the Yorkshire Terriers, so I looked for them in the local newspapers.  I found a breeder that had one, so I contacted her about the dog.  I went to meet her and the dog, and I ended up buying the dog from her.  I would NEVER go to a pet store to buy a dog, especially a purebred dog, like a Yorkie.  The Yorkie that I bought had papers, indicating the parents of the dog, which you need to make sure of the purebred lineage.

 

About a month after I got the dog, the nurse at my doctor's office mentioned that her cat had just had kittens.  I wanted to get a cat also, since my wife had both a dog and a cat growing up.  We went to this nurse's house, checked out the litter of cats, and my wife picked out one, but we couldn't take it home since it wasn't 8 weeks old yet.  Once it was 8 weeks old, we went back to the nurse's house, and picked up the cat.

 

That dog and cat were two of the best pets that a person could have, especially when a few years later, my daughter was born, and both of the pets treated her like she was their own child.  They were very gentle with her, and if she would hit them on the hit, since she was too young to know how to pet them, or she would grab their tails, they would never snap at her, or growl at her, they just wanted to look after her well being.

 

To get back on topic, I think that you can have your pet micro-chipped, so that, if your pet runs away, you can use your smartphone to locate them.  While that may sound like s good thing to most people, keep in mind that if, it keep keep  tabs on your pet, it can also keep tabs on you.....and people use their cell phones to make banking transactions?  Uh, okay, good luck with that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buddy7
11 hours ago, Hammer said:

Buddy, but even if you don't have an app on your cell phone to find locations, your cell phone is still connected to the GPS satellites, so other people can see where you are. your smartphone has built in GPS.  This is just one  of a number of reasons that my cell stays turned off, and sitting on my desk, and it doesn't travel with me, unless I'm going to be driving a good distance away, in which case I'll take it in case I break down.

One suspects, the remedy for this, is to power off your handset that means the tracker location ends at that point where you power off your cell phone handset. Also, the GPS signals end at that point. When you power off your cell phone, it will stop communicating with nearby cell towers and can be traced only to the location it was in when it was powered off. GPS will be of no help as it consistently needs cellular and/or internet access to gather the location details.

 

Watched this movie some time ago, 3 men were about to commit a robbery, as they met for the last time before the robbery began, the leader said, now this is the time to switch off all our cell phones and dumped them before we get on to the job. The police found all 3 cell phones power off at a point miles away from the robbery, where the GPS ceased to operate because they were powered off.

 

The point I’m trying to make, if you don’t want your Network or any other to know your whereabouts, power off your cell phone, where necessary. The way I see things, technology are just in its infancy, we just have to make good choices about our cell phone at all times. But then again, this just depletes the whole concept of the on-going cell phone handset scenario.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
notme

Hi Hammer,

 

Honestly, I have not had my HAM radio out in two years.  But, like I said, we moved, we have an HOA and I had an injury that took a year for healing.  So, I didn’t do much.  
 

What has happened in the recent months made me realize how important communication is and I don’t want to leave any rock unturned.  So out came the radio and my Re-education was started.  
 

I have a Yaesu FT-60R.  I just ordered a better diamond antenna for it to improve its range.  Nice durable little portable unit.  I had to order a new battery for it as I left it sitting on the charger for about a year.  It degraded the battery down to about 5 hours.  
 

We may be moving again but, for now it is lovely to have my radio yapping at me.  It feels right.  
 

thank you for all of the encouragement. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Notme, that looks like a nice HT!  If you haven't already, I would also get their car cigarette light plug adapter, so that you can power the HT off of the car's battery, as well as it also charges the HT.  And maybe as an added measure, get an adapter that connects to your outside antenna's PL-259 connector that's connected to your Kenwood rig, and adapts it to fit the antenna connection on your HT, so that, in the event you lose power in your house, you can connect your outside antenna to your HT, and use the HT to stay in touch with the outside world, as the outside antenna will have a much great range that the HT mounted antenna.  Your HT has an SMA connector on it, but I don't know if it's a male or female SMA connector.  You'd need an adapter that has an SO-239 connector on one end to connect to your outside antenna's PL-259 connector, and an SMA connector on the other end.  If you're not sure which connector your HT has, then just get an assortment pack, as one of those in the pack will do what you need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Notme, I forgot to mention that I just bought this antenna analyzer.  I've been wanting to get one, since they make it really easy to see what frequencies your antennas are resonant on.  For 2-meters, it's not an issue, but with HF, it's an invaluable tool.  I have always had a problem getting my parallel dipole to tune up on 80 meters, even with my rig's auto-tuner, or my manual antenna tuner.  This analyzer should tell me what frequency it will tune to that results in a low SWR.  Once I know the frequency, I can then adjust my antenna to make it tune up on the frequency that I want it to tune up on.  I could just adjust the antenna, then see what the SWR is without using an analyzer, but my parallel dipole is 84 feet long, and is strung up between two trees, so to make an adjustment, then see how it tunes up, would mean that I'd have to lower the antenna, make an adjustment, raise it back up, then see how it tunes up.  I would need to do that a number of times, before I'd find the correct length for it.  With a tuner, it would indicate the frequency that it tunes up best on, and from that, I would only need to lower the antenna once, make the proper adjustment, and raise it back up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diana_CT
16 hours ago, Hammer said:

I forgot to mention that I just bought this antenna analyzer.

Hammer.
Your post about the antenna analyzer brought back memories from when I was fresh out of college in 1974. My first job was at Pioneer Medical where we made electronic medical equipment (Do you remember the show Emergency that was a demo of our mobile EKG unit that the company made for the show). The EKG units used a special 5 watt Motorola walkie-talkie that they broke in half separating the transmitter from the receiver and the transmitter we feed a 25W RCA linear amp. That went to a resonant tuned cans filter for duplex operation (The doctors wanted to talk and listen like a telephone, it was to complicated for them to say over.) and the antenna was a 19 inch whip. The frequency that they used was 468 MHz.
We used a Cushman Spectrum Analyzer to tune everything up.
The company was located in New Britain CT and we used to do a radio check to a Long Island two-way radio shop there that serviced our equipment for ambulances there, a distance of about 70 miles.
Well one bored day I noticed that our desk lamp use 19 inch florescent lamps… Hmm, 19 inch lamp… 19 inch whip antenna! So I stuck one of the lamp pins in the RG58 socket, keyed it up and did a radio check with Long Island, the bulb lit up. And I got through to them on 468 MHz @ 25 watts with a 19 inch florescent lightbulb for the antenna! I joked with the chief engineer that we could advertise it as a nightlight.
Some day I have to tell you about the time I defibrillated a Tektronix scope (Hint: it did like it being  defibrillated) or how I learned to pocket the transmitter key when working on the antenna up on the roof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Diana_CT, I would imagine that the Motorola walkie-talkies were transmitting FM signals, since that's what most VHF and UHF transmitters use.  The antennas that you used, as well as what the Long Island station used, must have been really nice antennas, since 25 watts of an FM transmission on 468 MHz, wouldn't go 70 miles, unless they were using good antennas.

 

Depending on the florescent lamp that you connected to the RG58 socket, which was most likely an SO-239 socket that connected to RG58 coax cable,  I wonder if you had tried to just lay that lamp down on the table, next to the SO-239 connector?  There are a number of light bulbs that will light up when placed next to a transmitted signal.  On, and yes, touching an antenna when someone is transmitting will give you a nasty RF burn.  What always amazed me was that, if you touch an antenna when someone is transmitting, it will burn you, yet, once they stop transmitting, the antenna is cold to the touch. 

 

Anyway, it sounds like you had an interesting career!😊

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

Maybe a little off-topic but "Emergency!" was one of my favorite TV shows growing up.

 

I have looked into the show's history and the producers tried to be as realistic as they could.  Being in telecom, it was interesting to look into what the tones did before the call out.  Each station's radio could either receive all traffic on the PA keeping the crew from resting or selectively activate when a certain tone combination was received. 

 

My biggest take away from Emergency was that "D-Fib" was a very bad thing.

 

Fun fact - For dramatic license, they would shock a patient that was flat-lined.  The reality is the paddles only work on defibrillated patients.  The shock stops the heart and, hopefully, the body will resume the heart muscle function with a more normalized rhythym.

 

They also came up with some imaginative scenarios.  It has aged quite well even though the tech is antique lol...  But, yeah, that portable EKG thing was cool.  I wished I had one...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Diana_CT
1 hour ago, Hammer said:

Diana_CT, I would imagine that the Motorola walkie-talkies were transmitting FM signals, since that's what most VHF and UHF transmitters use.  The antennas that you used, as well as what the Long Island station used, must have been really nice antennas, since 25 watts of an FM transmission on 468 MHz, wouldn't go 70 miles, unless they were using good antennas.

 

Depending on the florescent lamp that you connected to the RG58 socket, which was most likely an SO-239 socket that connected to RG58 coax cable,  I wonder if you had tried to just lay that lamp down on the table, next to the SO-239 connector?  There are a number of light bulbs that will light up when placed next to a transmitted signal.  On, and yes, touching an antenna when someone is transmitting will give you a nasty RF burn.  What always amazed me was that, if you touch an antenna when someone is transmitting, it will burn you, yet, once they stop transmitting, the antenna is cold to the touch. 

 

Anyway, it sounds like you had an interesting career!😊

I believe it was FM and it was line of sight...almost, our building was on top of hill and we were on the 5th floor and out of my window on clear day I could see Long Island Sound 25 miles away and the tops of skyscrapers in NYC,  the two-way radio shop was located near the north shore of Long Island Sound in Nassau County within sight of the sound.

"... it will burn you." It did. The base station was 75W and I had a nice blister on the palm of hand. It was the flickering florescent lights that gave me the idea.

Speaking of flickering florescent lights, I worked at a summer job where they made helicopters for the Navy and when they tested the radar on the helicopters the florescent lights brighten as the beam swept by them. I tried to be far, far away when they tested it. I learned many years latter that that the technician died of cancer.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.