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AlexSD44

Newly Diagnosed 31 Y/O Male Type 1

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AlexSD44

My health went downhill for about a month, I lost 25 pounds and was having extreme thirst and peeing all the time along with being really lethargic.

 

Finally I ended up throwing up and laying in it for about 3-4 hours because I couldn't move and wound up in the ER. 

 

My A1C was over 14% and the entire week in the hospital I had trouble going under 200 with my blood sugar. 200 obviously wasn't my highest but I couldn't seem to get below that. 

 

It turns out I had keto acidosis and they said I was an hour or two from slipping into a coma and potentially dying. 

 

Since I've been out I've been eating really healthy and following the advice on eating the best I can. 

 

I mainly wanted to say I'm proud of myself because my readings before meals recently have all been in the normal range of 80 to 100 and I seem to be doing a really good job managing myself and not snacking on junk food and so on. 

 

I've been taking my insulin on schedule and my body definitely feels better but at the same time weak from muscle loss since I was eating myself alive. 

 

Its not hard to eat well, but at the same time I sometimes now find myself a bit sad that I can't just grab a snack like a donut and eat it or grab a tub of ice cream and plow away at it like I used to despite the fact im a thin and otherwise healthy person. 

 

Also im used to being a very active person and my body is so weak from the hospital plus all the weight I lost, going back to work has been hard because I can't do the things I used to at this point. 

 

I'm not even sure if my post has a point other than outreach and sharing my story/feelings with others who might understand. 

 

Thanks for reading. 

 

 

Edited by AlexSD44

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adiantum

Hello Alex, welcome to the forum.

 

You now have a great future ahead now that you are in control of your body. 

~Lee

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meyery2k

Welcome!  We all share this struggle.  You have come very far!  Excellent! ~ Mike

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Dowling

Hi  Alex Welcome to the forum

 

Don't feel sad. Look for low carb ice cream when shopping and make yourself some almond flour or flax muffins. They freeze well and can be thawed in the microwave. Look at "All day I dream about food" she has some excellent recipes. A handful of nuts can make a satisfying snack too. There a low carb alternatives to just about anything. Look at keto products too and read the labels if you want ready to eat low carb snacks.

 

You will be eating low carb for the rest of your life so it has to be a satisfying diet that you can stick to long term. One thing I found is that my tastes changed. If I have a piece of doughnut now it tastes unbearable sweet so that nixes it for me.

 

Look up the complications of diabetes and remember them when you are tempted. You'll remember why you won't eat that thing. Start slow with the exercise. The best way is to walk--as far as you are able and a little bit--remember you have to return. Later you can add light weights to your wrists to exercise your upper body. You will gain muscle. How much is up to you. After you get in a bit better shape you can pick what exercise is best for you--playing sports or bike riding or whatever you want to keep you active

 

Keep in touch and ask any questions you have. Someone will answer

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AlexSD44
2 hours ago, Dowling said:

Hi  Alex Welcome to the forum

 

Don't feel sad. Look for low carb ice cream when shopping and make yourself some almond flour or flax muffins. They freeze well and can be thawed in the microwave. Look at "All day I dream about food" she has some excellent recipes. A handful of nuts can make a satisfying snack too. There a low carb alternatives to just about anything. Look at keto products too and read the labels if you want ready to eat low carb snacks.

 

You will be eating low carb for the rest of your life so it has to be a satisfying diet that you can stick to long term. One thing I found is that my tastes changed. If I have a piece of doughnut now it tastes unbearable sweet so that nixes it for me.

 

Look up the complications of diabetes and remember them when you are tempted. You'll remember why you won't eat that thing. Start slow with the exercise. The best way is to walk--as far as you are able and a little bit--remember you have to return. Later you can add light weights to your wrists to exercise your upper body. You will gain muscle. How much is up to you. After you get in a bit better shape you can pick what exercise is best for you--playing sports or bike riding or whatever you want to keep you active

 

Keep in touch and ask any questions you have. Someone will answer

 

Thanks for the ideas and encouragement.

 

One thing I do want to ask anyone who may know.

 

When my blood sugar gets around low 90s to upper 80s I start to feel a bit hypoglycemic even though thats pre-meal target range.

 

. I've read that its normal when you've been at a higher blood sugar for a while to feel that way...but I'm kind of wondering how long on average or for others that sort of side effect lasts before your body really adjusts. 

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meyery2k

From what I remember, I felt a little "off" for about 3 weeks while I was working on getting my glucose down.  My fasting BG when I first found out I had diabetes was 312.   Your body gets used to it so when you are lower, your body won't like that at first.  You will change fairly quickly and adapt.

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meyery2k
7 hours ago, AlexSD44 said:

Also im used to being a very active person and my body is so weak from the hospital plus all the weight I lost, going back to work has been hard because I can't do the things I used to at this point. 

 

I can share a different perspective with you in the hopes it may provide some guidance.  When I was first diagnosed, I weighed 313 pounds.   I was sedentary.  I live on the 3rd floor of a walkup and would be huffing and puffing after going up the stairs.  No energy.  My family tried to talk to me but I told them it was my life and I was OK with it.  The reality is that I knew I had let myself go and I thought it was too late to come back.

 

Diabetes woke me up.  The only thing I could do to start was walk and that is what I did.  10,000 steps a day.  3 days.  1 day to rest.  After I changed, my neighbor joked I looked like I was going to drop dead at first from the walking.  I felt like I would!  It didn't take too long to build up strength and conditioning.  Eventually I lost that weight, got into shape, and really feel good.

 

Now that you know what is going on, I believe you will bounce back pretty quickly.  Just take it slow and steady. ~ Mike

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Dowling

Alex--What Mike didn't tell you is that now he bike rides for miles and miles almost daily and is in excellent shape. He's like a marathon runner only he does it on a bike. So you see your case is far from hopeless and Mike's living proof of that.

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Coravh
12 hours ago, AlexSD44 said:

 

Thanks for the ideas and encouragement.

 

One thing I do want to ask anyone who may know.

 

When my blood sugar gets around low 90s to upper 80s I start to feel a bit hypoglycemic even though thats pre-meal target range.

 

. I've read that its normal when you've been at a higher blood sugar for a while to feel that way...but I'm kind of wondering how long on average or for others that sort of side effect lasts before your body really adjusts. 

This feeling is called a 'false low'. Because of what you went through, you body has become more accustomed to being outrageously high. So for a little while, a more normal blood glucose level will feel 'low'. A bit more time at more normal levels and this won't happen any more. Although it sometimes will if you have a rapid drop.

 

On a more positive note, please remember this. You can (and will) live a long and happy life with T1. You just have to work for it a bit. T1 will not stop you from doing anything. Run a marathon? Sure. Clime Mount Everest? Why not? You can do it. You will figure out a way. I've had T1 now for over 55 years. It's not a barrel of laughs, but it's do-able.

 

Oh, and while eating well is important, splurging is good for your emotional well being every once in a while. Get a good handle on your basals, insulin to carb ratios, and insulin sensitivity factors and you can gobble down that pint of ice cream every once in a while. Just don't do it on a regular basis. I would also strongly suggest these books:

 

Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner

Sugar Surfing by Stephen Ponder

 

Work hard and enjoy your life. It's going to be great.

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AlexSD44
7 hours ago, Coravh said:

This feeling is called a 'false low'. Because of what you went through, you body has become more accustomed to being outrageously high. So for a little while, a more normal blood glucose level will feel 'low'. A bit more time at more normal levels and this won't happen any more. Although it sometimes will if you have a rapid drop.

 

On a more positive note, please remember this. You can (and will) live a long and happy life with T1. You just have to work for it a bit. T1 will not stop you from doing anything. Run a marathon? Sure. Clime Mount Everest? Why not? You can do it. You will figure out a way. I've had T1 now for over 55 years. It's not a barrel of laughs, but it's do-able.

 

Oh, and while eating well is important, splurging is good for your emotional well being every once in a while. Get a good handle on your basals, insulin to carb ratios, and insulin sensitivity factors and you can gobble down that pint of ice cream every once in a while. Just don't do it on a regular basis. I would also strongly suggest these books:

 

Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner

Sugar Surfing by Stephen Ponder

 

Work hard and enjoy your life. It's going to be great.

 

Thank you for the information, advice and book recommendation. It means a lot to see other people doing things with their lives and not being walled in by the diagnosis. 

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