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Mariel's Mom

Correction Factor

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Mariel's Mom

I am curious to find out from other parents what your child's correction factor is for high blood sugars. My daugher has been having low blood sugar episodes and they usually occur after I have corrected a higher blood sugar along with her meal insulin. Usually in before bed - her sugar will be within range at bedtime (approx 2.5 or 3 hours after insulin and then drops to 70's or 60's an hour later - I'm also finding that her Novalog needs the full 4 hours (and then some - to completely work which is very different from the beginning _ 6 months ago - when it reliably worked within the 2 hour timeframe) I correct 1/2 unit for every 50 over 150 blood sugar. (and I have accounted meticulously for all carbs eaten - Her carb ratio is 1/20g) Do any of you have a smaller correction factors.

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nantomsuethom

Thomas requires more insulin. He usually needs 1u to bring him down 50. Most of the time this works and then for some unknown reason this will bring him down too low.

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rzrbks
nantomsuethom

 

Thomas requires more insulin. He usually needs 1u to bring him down 50. Most of the time this works and then for some unknown reason this will bring him down too low.[/QUOTE]

 

Phases of the Moons of Saturn Effect

 

 

The normal bolus correction ratio seems to be 1:50/2.7: 1 unit drops B/G 50/2.7 points at 1 hour.

 

That can be mitiagted by all kinds of factors: exercise, lack of exercise, BMs, psychological state, hormones, so even when you find "The Perfect" correction bolus, you still have to keep a close eye on it.

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seacomp
The normal bolus correction ratio seems to be 1:50/2.7: 1 unit drops B/G 50/2.7 points at 1 hour.

Ummm, My correction facto is different, but no big deal. What's interesting is that you are looking at a 1 hour correction factor and I've always looked at it as a total correction factor.

That is, I expect my correction of 1 u per 35 points to take effect over the full 4 to 5 hours of the insulin action with about 50% happening in the initial hour.

When I'm over, I correct to my BG goal. If I used just the hour figure I'd constantly overshoot and go low sooner or later unless I halved my correction factor to 17.

What's the standard method of figuring this?

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rzrbks
That is, I expect my correction of 1 u per 35 points to take effect over the full 4 to 5 hours of the insulin action with about 50% happening in the initial hour.

When I'm over, I correct to my BG goal. If I used just the hour figure I'd constantly overshoot and go low sooner or later unless I halved my correction factor to 17.

What's the standard method of figuring this?

 

After visiting with my new CDE, I believe that's another one of those "What works for you" things

 

I have my Lantus set for a stable 95/5.2--110/6.1 (I check it every few weeks with an 18 hr fasting test) so, when I do the 2 hr postprandial check, I use the 1:50/2.7 ratio, if needed, and rarely do I ever drop below 95/5.2 afterwards. One proviso, however, I rarely go more than 2-3 hours without eating especially when I'm not at work.

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seacomp
when I do the 2 hr postprandial check, I use the 1:50/2.7 ratio,

Umm, Ummm! We seem to be using the same language and meaning something subtly different by it.

By correction factor, I refer to the amount of extra insulin to inject before a meal to bring my BG to target after the complete insulin-meal cycle.. For every 35 points that I am over 90, I add 1 U to the dose (in half Us).

I rarely do the 2 hour postprandial check because it usually shows me little. Unless the number were over 150, I won't correct anyway since the timing issues are so iffy. Were I to correct then, I would use the same ratio though with a minimum of 1 u.

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rzrbks
Umm, Ummm! We seem to be using the same language and meaning something subtly different by it.

By correction factor, I refer to the amount of extra insulin to inject before a meal to bring my BG to target after the complete insulin-meal cycle.. For every 35 points that I am over 90, I add 1 U to the dose (in half Us).

 

I honestly cannot remember the last time I was above 125/6.9 before eating a meal unless it was in mid-cycle (less than 2 hours after eating 30+ carbs)---at which point I don't figure that into my bolus, I just bolus for the amount of carbs I am eating. and then do the 2 hr check as usual.

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seacomp
I honestly cannot remember the last time I was above 125/6.9 before eating a meal
That's very good. I'm impressed.

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rzrbks
seacomp

 

rzrbks

I honestly cannot remember the last time I was above 125/6.9 before eating a meal

 

That's very good. I'm impressed.

 

 

OCD is the answer for Diabetes..........not a very good answer, but the one I use. :rofl:

 

:tee:

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someone

I think the most common correction rate is 1 unit for every 50 over 150. You are correcting double that.

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rzrbks
someone

 

I think the most common correction rate is 1 unit for every 50 over 150. You are correcting double that.

 

Don't forget that each of us responds differently to different regimens and that we all make adjustments to "The Norm."

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Cyborg

You can actually test this. Here is a description on how to do this test. This is also called your ISF, or Insulin Sensitivity Factor. Ideally, it should be checked for different times of the day and under different conditions. It must be hard to do with the little ones. Best wishes...

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samsmom

Hi I am new here. my son sam is 4 1/2 and was dx at age 15 months. he is on a cozmo insulin pump. I think correction factors are different for everyone. for sam, during the day, his correction factor is 150..meaning that one unit drops his bg 150 points. during the night, he is extra sensitive to insulin and his correction is 220, insulin will drop him 220 points. his target is 150. so we just do the math (well the pump does) and give him the correct dose. hope this helps with "others " correction factors

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seacomp
Hi I am new here. my son sam is 4 1/2 and was dx at age 15 months.

Hello SamsMom and Sam (by proxy) you are welcome to the forum:flowers: , although we regret that you have reason to be here. It must be so hard for you and the little one.

We thank you for the information, it means so much more coming from a mother.

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Tim_Roy

Yeah, everyone's ISF/correction factor is different. People on MDI sometimes tend towards easy to compute schemes, like the aforementioned 50.

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psilocybin

im 1:10mmol...but im honeymooning so its probly different...i drop like crazy when i correct, usually get lows

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gettingby

My new CDE sat down and figured mine to be 1:38 the very first time I saw her. Works very well most of the time but every so often, it works too well and sends me hypo. :dontknow:

Remember, in diabetes, ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL.

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