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shoop99

adam morrison

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shoop99

I'm sure many of you have heard of Adam Morrison(college bball player with type 1). I have read many articles of him and read that morrison would take insulin shots during games..? My question is why? Wouldnt playing an intense game of basketball at the college level lower his sugar levels instead of raising them? Some one tried explaining it to me but i just didnt get it. Does anyone have an explanation? Thanks.

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duck
I'm sure many of you have heard of Adam Morrison(college bball player with type 1). I have read many articles of him and read that morrison would take insulin shots during games..? My question is why? Wouldnt playing an intense game of basketball at the college level lower his sugar levels instead of raising them? Some one tried explaining it to me but i just didnt get it. Does anyone have an explanation? Thanks.

 

Some of us actually get a blood sugar rise from exercise...it's part of some people's 'flight or fight' response, and the liver dumps glucose into your bloodstream to either fight or run (remember, deep down, we are cavemen that either need to catch the buffalo to eat or run from the TRex to survive). There are a few threads here where the "sufferers" of this affliction discuss their issues.

 

Also, never rule out ignorant sports writers who mistakenly say Morrison takes shots during games.

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sugarfree76

Also, never rule out ignorant sports writers who mistakenly say Morrison takes shots during games.

Being a Basketball player, I sure hope he takes shots during his games

:aetsch: :playingba

 

Some of us actually get a blood sugar rise from exercise...it's part of some people's 'flight or fight' response, and the liver dumps glucose into your bloodstream to either fight or run (remember, deep down, we are cavemen that either need to catch the buffalo to eat or run from the TRex to survive). There are a few threads here where the "sufferers" of this affliction discuss their issues.

.

Perfect example: Before I went outside today, I was 134. I did yardwork (moderate) for about 5 hrs. I didn't shut off the pump or anything (1.10u/hr basal). I came in at 6pm....I got rung up at 235mg/dl. Friggin bites! :rolleyes:

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duck
Perfect example: Before I went outside today, I was 134. I did yardwork (moderate) for about 5 hrs. I didn't shut off the pump or anything (1.10u/hr basal). I came in at 6pm....I got rung up at 235mg/dl. Friggin bites! :rolleyes:

 

Yeah, sounds like your liver gives you a "shot" of glucose to help out. Mine does not, I literally turn my pump down to half basal for yardwork. And I still find myself drinking gatorade with no bolus.

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BriOnH

There is some guy on the Oakland A's that wears a pump. I don't really like watching sports, prefer to play them, but when a diabetic is in a game it makes watching more fun. I literally loathe watching basketball (like playing it though) but will for sure watch a game or two of Morrison's.

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xMenace
Some of us actually get a blood sugar rise from exercise...it's part of some people's 'flight or fight' response, and the liver dumps glucose into your bloodstream to either fight or run (remember, deep down, we are cavemen that either need to catch the buffalo to eat or run from the TRex to survive). There are a few threads here where the "sufferers" of this affliction discuss their issues.

 

Also, never rule out ignorant sports writers who mistakenly say Morrison takes shots during games.

 

I saw the video during the draft. I was surprised he didn't use a pen.

 

My Dr. explained to me that dehydration will trigger the liver to release sugars. I experienced the same this winter playing hockey at 7am - start at 6mmol/l and I'd be 24 after!

 

I now make sure I keep hydrated at all times.

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duck
I saw the video during the draft. I was surprised he didn't use a pen.

 

My Dr. explained to me that dehydration will trigger the liver to release sugars. I experienced the same this winter playing hockey at 7am - start at 6mmol/l and I'd be 24 after!

 

I now make sure I keep hydrated at all times.

 

There are at least three members here who, almost as soon as they begin to workout, their blood sugars take off like a rocket. I have been like :hmmmm: ever since I found out about this phenomenon. I've never had such a problem, but I also apparently NEVER liver dump for any reason. But anyway, we looked into different solutions, and none of them really worked for these members.

 

Check this out:

 

http://www.diabetesforums.com/exercise/7758-exercise-causing-problems-revisited.html?

Any insight you could add would be appreciated.

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Jazz

I swim once a week for around 30 minutes and work at an aerobic level (around 50% to 70% effort) and this has the effect of lowering my BG. However, I took part in a swimming gala last week and completed 6 x 25 metre sprints (at 100% effort) during the course of the evening. I took my BG at hourly intervals and found that is was rising continuously, the last and highest figure being 13.7mmol/s. I understand that exercise above 85% effort (classed as anaerobic exercise) causes the BG to rise due to the liver releasing extra glucose to the muscles. (Incidently, within 2 hours after the gala it plummetted to 5.0mmol/s, probably due to the muscles re-stocking).

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duck
I swim once a week for around 30 minutes and work at an aerobic level (around 50% to 70% effort) and this has the effect of lowering my BG. However, I took part in a swimming gala last week and completed 6 x 25 metre sprints (at 100% effort) during the course of the evening. I took my BG at hourly intervals and found that is was rising continuously, the last and highest figure being 13.7mmol/s. I understand that exercise above 85% effort (classed as anaerobic exercise) causes the BG to rise due to the liver releasing extra glucose to the muscles. (Incidently, within 2 hours after the gala it plummetted to 5.0mmol/s, probably due to the muscles re-stocking).

 

Not for me: Submaximal or maximal, I will go low. Whether squatting with hundreds of pounds on my shoulders or jogging. I'm weird.

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