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    meyery2k
    Teaser Paragraph:

    Metformin is proving to be quite a useful prescription.

    Interesting article about Metformin helping curb nicotine withdrawal.
     
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/diabetes-drug-could-help-block-nicotine-withdrawal/ar-AAvxyRE?ocid=spartanntp

    meyery2k

    April Fools - Then and now

    By meyery2k, in index,

    Teaser Paragraph:

    Perspective reflecting upon the 72nd anniversary of the April Fool's tsunami...

    April 1, 2018 - Easter Sunday, April Fool's day and the 72nd anniversary of a destructive Pacific wide tsunami.
     
    April 1 1946 2:28 AM HST.  An earthquake in the Aleutian islands (Alaska) generates a tsunami that travels across the Pacific ocean.  6:45 AM HST, a little under 5 hours, the tsunami strikes the Big Island of Hawai'i causing massive damage along the coast and resulting in 159 deaths statewide.  
     
    Residents had no warning and no time to evacuate.  This event led to the creation of the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center and the deployment of tools to learn more about tsunamis and to help predict when and where they might strike.
     
    The idea of the tsunami has always held a strange fascination for me and I now live in a place that is unusually susceptible to their effects.  I see reminders of their destructive potential daily.  We have a beautiful park upon which there was once a Japanese settlement known as Shinmachi.  Shinmachi was devastated in 1946 and, after rebuilding, tragedy struck once again in 1960.
     
    Shinmachi was not rebuilt and the bayfront is now one large park where many people enjoy recreational activities, unaware of what was once there.  I woke up today and Shinmachi was on my mind so I decided to write an article in memory of them and all others that suffered on that tragic April Fool's day when the normally placid ocean played a particularly cruel prank with little warning.
     
    I don't particularly believe in places being haunted but, if a place could be haunted, Shinmachi would surely fit the bill.
     
    Then and now...
     

     

    meyery2k

    My first speech about diabetes

    By meyery2k, in index,

    Teaser Paragraph:

    The day has come and gone...

    Today finally dawned and I was ready to give my presentation to a diabetes support group.  I must admit that I was anxious because I felt like I would be a rookie in the group trying out for the big leagues.  It seems so ironic to be trying out for the big leagues among a group of people with a chronic illness but there I was.
     
    1PM rolls around and the introductions begin.  Sure enough there are several people there with 20 years of experience with Type 2.  One lady had lost her fingers and parts of her legs to complications and yet she manages to drive a stick shift automobile.  Another lady looks healthy but commented that age is catching up to her and it is a little harder to manage.  Like many of us, she was able to control her diabetes with diet and exercise.
     
    I can only say that it was a humbling experience.  I introduced myself and then expressed that just meeting them gave me hope that I could live with this for a long time.  I then share my journey.  Many of you know the stories like Macy's and such so I won't repeat them.
     
    After my presentation, I can say that I was accepted.  What I had to say wasn't surprising and it was accepted.  Auntie Edna emphasized we all had different journeys on this path and thanked me for sharing mine.
     
    One of the veterans commented how much easier it is now than it was 25 years ago.  Apparently, the first thing done was to get you started on insulin.  The Internet and groups like DF are actually changing that.  So while it feels like we are beating our heads against the wall, change is happening.  Hui Malama is actually trying to reach out to doctors locally and challenge what they think they know about diabetes.  
     
    I hope I will have the opportunity to do this again.  To me, it is so fulfilling to share and help others.  Once again, unexpectedly, I learned something new.  I have come a long way and it is exciting to look forward to where I might go.

    meyery2k

    Old dogs and old tricks

    By meyery2k, in index,

    Teaser Paragraph:

    Can this old dog with an old trick restore peace in the house with a dog?

    Charlie, my daughter Kala's dog, is a tad overweight.  She has been exercising more with him and has modified his diet a little.  Sounds familiar....
     
    The diet change has been a little bit of a struggle because he won't eat.  After a few days of this, Kala has become concerned and has turned to the most reliable source of trusted information out there, Google.
     
    This in spite of the fact that my Mom for a good deal of her life bred, raised, and showed Afghan Hounds.  We have had our share of temperamental dogs over the years but she seemed to always know how to handle them.  I offered a simple piece of advice that I remember my Mom telling me once and I was given short shrift because it couldn't possibly work.
     
    So there has been this epic struggle to get Charlie to eat.  Pleading, sitting with him, scolding, taking away the food after 5 minutes, the gamut...
     
    Kala had some evening plans so the task of feeding Charlie fell to me.  I was apparently also going to be responsible for making sure he ate.  I was given this long elaborate instruction set that I promptly ignored in old dude fashion.  I was not going to invest all that time and energy in getting a dog to eat.
     
    Feeding time rolls around and I add about a Tbsp of olive oil.  My mom said, that in many cases, adding a little fat to the dinner will make them eat it.  She would use olive oil, cheese, bacon fat, or butter.  Not a lot either.  Dinner was gone in under 5 minutes.  I can relate since I too love olive oil, bacon fat, and butter.
     
    I loved it even more when she came home and saw the empty dish.  She was happy that he ate and I explained what I did.  While I would have loved to take credit for the "Dad, you're a genius!" comment from my near college graduate daughter that sometimes thinks she knows more than the old man (many times she actually does but I will never admit it), I had to give the credit to her grandmother.
     
    This morning, we "rinsed and repeated" with olive oil and peace, for now, reigns once again.
     
    This old dog is resting on his laurels and especially enjoying his morning coffee.
     

    meyery2k

    Giving a speech on March 20, 2018

    By meyery2k, in index,

    Teaser Paragraph:

    My debut article...

    Tony has invited me to try my hand at writing articles.  I see myself as a sort of Erma Bombeck and it will be interesting to see how this works out.
     
    This Tuesday, March 20, I have been invited to be a guest speaker at Hui Malama which is a medical outreach program designed to reach out to Native Hawaiians and give them access to quality healthcare and education.  This is something sorely needed.
     
    Auntie Edna visited us and gave us a very good presentation about diabetes.  I shared my story with her and was invited to reciprocate.  It was originally going to be in July but an unexpected opening came up that I was asked to fill.
     
    My goal would be to share with the audience that I can live with diabetes.  I live a normal life and do all the things I want to do.  While I have to watch what I eat and exercise, I should have been doing those things all along.
     
    I confess to being a little anxious since this will be outside my comfort zone.  Much like when I posted my introduction here.  I feel like I am going to be preaching to the big leagues and will likely have people in the audience that have really struggled with this.  Aunty Edna has been supportive.  I explained how I controlled diabetes and she was surprisingly accepting.  Like many of us here, her philosophy is that if it works for you go for it.
     
    I am going to walk in wearing my size 44 pants and belt and then drop them off to show what can be done and then go from there.  All the accomplishments to date really stemmed from finding out I had diabetes.  I believe I have learned from the best out there and plan to share what I have learned.  More importantly, I can show that it worked.
     
     

    Tony

    FDA approves inhaled Insulin

    By Tony, in index,

    Teaser Paragraph:

    For many years insulin came in form of injection. Now today the FDA approves a fast acting inhaled insulin called Afrezza

    Afrezza is a powder delivered by a small inhaler device at the start of meals. Once the dry powered is inhaled into the lungs, the insulin is delivered into the bloodstream. Insulin levels peak as fast as 15 minutes compared to 3 hours for injectable insulin. Since Afrezza is a fast acting insulin, type 1 patients will still need to take a long acting insulin by injection for basal.
     
    Do you plan on trying Afrezza? Do you think there is a greater risk for low blood sugar? Let us know in the comments below.

    DeusXM

    Pumping in the UK

    By DeusXM, in index,

    So, you've arrived at diabetesforums.com and found all these Americans who love their insulin pumps. So no doubt you now want one, and you're probably fuming that the NHS hasn't offered you one. Obviously you've got loads of questions, so here's a few answers to the most common ones.
     
    What is an insulin pump?
     
    It's a small electronic device with some tubing that connects to your body. Throughout the day it releases a small, steady flow of insulin, which is your basal insulin. Then when you eat, you set it to give you a larger flow of insulin for a short period of time - this is your bolus insulin.
     
    That's a really basic description, ask a pumper for more details.
     
    I want one!
     
    Good for you. Go get one then.
     
    But I live in Britain! Because of our stupid backwards healthcare system I can't get one! Why can't we be more like the much better American system?
     
    WRONG WRONG WRONG
     
    There is absolutely nothing stopping you getting a pump if you live in the UK. Pumps are just as easily available as they are in the United States and your care team isn't going to stand in the way of you getting them.
     
    It is perfectly easy to get a pump in the UK. It's just that you won't get them free on the NHS unless you meet certain criteria. However, there's absolutely nothing stopping you getting a pump through private insurance such as BUPA, or even just buying it yourself. Which is exactly what they do in the States.
     
    Incidentally, don't forget that the 'backwards' health service we have in the UK gives you insulin pens (which is more than what most Americans get) and all your prescriptions for completely free.
     
    That's stupid. Shouldn't the NHS provide pumps for free?
     
    In an ideal world, yes. Unfortunately, pumps cost anything up to £4000, which is a lot to spend on treatment. That's what our American pumpers tend to have to pay too, so it's not as if we're being ripped off.
     
    So it's a lot of money, and the NHS (like anyone else) has to make sure it's getting value for money. Dishing out pumps to everyone with diabetes isn't good value and isn't necessarily helpful. For a start, a pump will be of no use to you unless you really know what you're doing when it comes to treating your diabetes. Otherwise it's rather like buying a jet fighter and then using it to taxi down the road to the shops. Sure, it'll work, but you could have acheived much the same results by walking.
     
    Secondly, the principles of the pump are pretty much the same as those for multiple daily injections (MDI). Sometimes you'll also hear MDI referred to as the '4-a-day' system or something similar. It's actually incorrect terminology - under MDI you inject when you eat, so that could mean 4 times a day, or it could mean 3, or 6...you get the idea. Anyway, MDI mimics the science behind pump treatment and as a result can acheive just as good results. Unless you have particularly pronounced Dawn Phenomenon or a massively fluctuating basal insulin requirement, you can get A1c in the 6s and even in the 5s. So from an NHS perspective, why spend at least £4000 on a treatment that they can do for under £100?
     
    However, the NHS does also provide free pumps.
     
    Say that again? I can get a free pump on the NHS? How?
     
    Individual NHS regions have their own criteria for pump selection. Informally though, if you fall into all of the following, you are a good candidate for a free pump:
     
    1) You are having serious control problems with MDI.
    You are having frequent hypos, swinging wildly between lows and highs, and/or are suffering from severe hypo unawareness.
     
    2)You are competant in the theory of treating your diabetes
    You are able to carb count and have been on a DAFNE course or similar. You also are able to provide regular, reliable BG results from testing at least 4x a day. You are able to correct high blood sugar with an appropriate amount of insulin and are able to identify your correction factor ie. by how many mmol/l 1u of insulin will lower you.
     
    3)You've tried all the other forms of MDI
    You're still having serious BG control problems and have tried Insulatard, Lantus and Levemir with no success. Or you've had some sort of problem with all 3 insulins, for instance too many hypos with Insulatard, an allergy to Lantus, and poor control with Levemir.
     
    If you meet all three of the above, you MAY be eligible for NHS provision of a pump. I'd also suggest that a good personal relationship with your care team will go a long way to swinging the decision in your favour. Your care team needs to be able to trust you completely - this means you have to work with them and be open about your treatment regime and lifestyle. Being aware of things like Dawn Phenomenon and the Somogyi Effect will help increase their respect for your understanding.
     
    Therefore it is perfectly possible to get a pump in the UK (if you can fund it yourself), and it is also possible to get one provided for you.
     
    REMEMBER: A pump is not a right, it's a privilege.

    DeusXM

    Think you might have diabetes?

    By DeusXM, in index,

    Do you think you might have diabetes?
     
    First, see if you suffer from some of the following symptoms:
     
    *Raging thirst
    *Frequent need to urinate
    *Rapid weight loss
    *Blurry vision
    *Fatigue
     
    One of these on their own doesn't really mean anything. Several all at the same time might.
     
    I have all the symptoms! Does that mean I have diabetes?
     
    No-one here on this forum can answer this question for you. As a group we might know a thing or two about diabetes but there is only ONE group of people on the whole planet that can tell you whether you have diabetes or not - doctors.
     
    If you think you have diabetes, don't umm and ahh about it. Don't bother getting some blood or urine testing kit from a pharmacy - at the most they'll point you in the right direction but they're by no means definitive. Don't kid yourself that you don't like doctors or hospitals. No-one does. But they're here to help.
     
    IF YOU THINK YOU HAVE DIABETES BUT AREN'T SURE, GO AND SEE A DOCTOR.
     
    Then we'll be able to help you with all the rest.

    Tony

    Appealing the cgms

    By Tony, in index,

    The basis for your appeal is that the cgms is covered pursuant to the General Laws. The State of Rhode Island where I live. 1956, as amended, §27-18-38(a)( , entitled “Diabetes Treatment” which states, in part “Upon the approval of new or improved diabetes equipment and supplies by the Food and Drug Administration, all policies governed by this section shall guarantee coverage of new diabetes equipment and supplies when medically appropriate and prescribed by a physician.”
     
    Now your probably asking yourself, does my state have a similar law?
     
    Last I checked 46 states have some type of laws requiring health insurance coverage to include treatment for diabetes and the four states that do not included coverage are Alabama, Idaho, North Dakota and Ohio.
     
    I have found California and Texas have a similar law to Rhode Island where health plans must provide coverage for new or improved diabetes equipment and supplies approved by the FDA when determined by a physician to be medically necessary and appropriate.
     
    For discussion on this topic click here.



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